Bridge 9 Records

For a lot of kids in my generation of hardcore, Bridge 9 was like our “Revelation Records #1-20”. No, I’m not trying to make any wild statement about American Nightmare being as influential as Gorilla Biscuits or something. I’m just drawing a parallel between the early tight-knit group of New York hardcore bands on Revelation in the late 80’s, and the group of Boston related hardcore bands of Bridge 9 in the late 90’s and early 2000 era. In both cases, the record label seemed to come out of nowhere to capture an entire era of hardcore within their early catalog, and both definitely had a particularly regional flavor to them.  From about B9R #6 (Right Brigade split 7″) through B9R #30 (No Warning “Ill Blood”), every time B9 announced a new release, it was like “fuck yeah, they are killing it!”  What’s really impressive about B9 is that they’ve kept it up for so long! I first started pre-ordering Bridge 9 releases with B9R #4, and I ordered almost every single record from that point on, up through B9R #100. Whereas Revelation kinda fell off into the “post hardcore” world after Rev #22 or so, Bridge 9 continued releasing a lot of the best hardcore stuff, up through about B9 #100 (they’ve since started dabbling in the “bigger” world of pop punk and things like that too). The bottom line is that B9 is still releasing hardcore music, hundreds of releases later, and that’s downright impressive, for any label. My collection documented below is a nearly 100% complete B9R #1-75, even including test pressings for probably 30-40% of them! I own plenty of B9 releases after #75 (Ceremony, Verse, Have Heart, Paint It Black, Strike Anywhere, Crime In Stereo, Polar Bear Club, etc), but I stopped my completist collection at Have Heart “The Things We Carry” because that was really the last record I was super attached to. #75 just seemed like a nice round number and the Have Heart LP was the perfect album to close out my “complete collection”. Any release after that I’ve sold off until I owned just one copy of each release. I did include a list at the very bottom which includes every B9 release that I own, even releases after #75. Hopefully you’ll get a kick out of this huge documentary of B9R #1-75… I don’t know if anyone has ever documented something this big, with this much detail before. Enjoy!

B9R-1  Ten Fold / Sum Of All Fears – “Split” 7″Bridge 9 Records #1, the record that started it all!  The green vinyl is out of only 113 copies, so it is a total bitch to find one of these things.  Not to mention a lot of the local folks that bought this record around New England probably aren’t really around anymore.  So finding one on green vinyl is pretty tough sometimes.  The rest were black vinyl, out of 900. Like all of the earliest Bridge 9 releases, the dust sleeves are numbered with a stamp.  The stamp color usually matched the vinyl, like in this case – the green vinyl got a green stamp, black vinyl got a black stamp.

A little advertisement for Standhard Records thrown inside.  It would be funny to call this phone number and ask for Jesse.  At this point it’s probably some old lady in Connecticut that still has a land line or something, haha.

The fold-over cover layout and insert.

B9R-2  Tenfold – “Now Is Our Time” 7″1st pressing was just 100 on blue vinyl, 200 on clear.  Another early B9 release on colored vinyl that is going to be tough to find due to its rarity and “local” nature.  2nd press was 500 more on black vinyl.

These were all numbered as well, on the inside of the cover.  My clear copy is #79/100.

The inside and outside of the fold-over cover.  Notice the blue number #147 on the inside cover – again, the stamp color matching the blue vinyl.

B9R-3  Proclamation – “Straight Edge Hardcore” 7″I always thought it was funny that the actual title of the 7″ is “Straight Edge Hardcore”.  Seems more like a description than a title, haha.  The 1st pressing was 101 on white vinyl, 200 on red, and 700 on black, all stamped just as before, with matching red stamp on the red vinyl.  Coincidentally, all of my numbers happen to be in the first 100, with 3 out of 4 of them are in the 30’s.  Kinda cool.  I also made sure to show the a-side vs. b-side labels on this 7″ are “Schwarzenegger vs. Eastwood”… Get it, “side S” and “side E” for Straight Edge?  Total dorks, haha.  Who knew that a few years later Arnold would be come the “governator” of California!

An early B9 Catalog advertising the next couple of releases on B9.  Notice the “Open Up 11 Song CD” slated to come out on B9 in Summer 1999.  Open Up had released a really cool demo cassette, and my friend Mike Stelle in San Luis Obispo, CA had released the Open  Up / In Reach split 7″ on Jitsu Records (see the Carry On blog entry for more info on Jitsu Records).  I remember him being stoked that Open Up was going to be doing a full length on Bridge 9, but I never remembered hearing anything directly from B9 about it, until I noticed this ad the other day when I was taking these photos. Cool!  Obviously Open Up broke up before they ever released anything else.  Also cool to note on this ad – the new Bad Brains skateboard deck that B9 was selling.  Back then, I knew B9 more as a skateboard and t-shirt company.  My best friend Zach Harlan had this banana yellow Bridge Nine Straight Edge shirt with a little Japanese Dragon Ball Z type guy on it.  When I was a kid, I thought that shirt and all of the other B9 straight edge shirts were so cool! haha.

The full layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-4  The Trust – “s/t” 7″The Trust 7″ ended up being an important record in my world, because this was the first pre-order I ever made from Bridge 9.  And from that day on, I think I pre-ordered every single thing B9 released up through B9R #100 or so! Seriously.  I guess you could call The Trust 7″ my gateway drug into the addiction of record collecting?! haha.  There was only one pressing, 101 on gold vinyl, 900 on black vinyl, all numbered with a stamp.  My gold vinyl copy is #89/101.  From this point on, Chris Wrenn always remembered me, and he went out of his way to send me the most limited version of everything whenever I pre-ordered, even if it meant sending me one of the “friends only” type pressings (like the AN 7″ on orange, or the Some Kind Of Hate 7″ with mistake AN label, or the No Warning “peanut butter and jelly” LP, etc).  He would always write me cool little notes on the back of fliers, just saying thanks for always ordering.  I think he just appreciated the fact that I had pretty much been there since the beginning.  I always really appreciated him looking out for me like that.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-5  Proclamation – “Taken By Force” CD:  This was a CD only release, so no vinyl.  I obviously never got into the business of collecting CDs, so from here on out, I’ll just make note of the CD-only catalog numbers, but no descriptions or photos.

B9R-6 Right Brigade / A Poor Excuse – “Split” 7″There is actually an individual Right Brigade blog entry, so this is just an excerpt from that… Right Brigade was a sweet band of the 1999-2001 era. They didn’t put out a ton of stuff, but that early stuff was kind of a game changer, at least at the time. It was snotty, angry, negative, NYHC influenced hardcore amongst an eastern seaboard scene of thin, clean sounding positive hardcore. The good: Right Brigade was a fucking sweet band to listen to, making you want to mosh your ass off and generally just kinda fuck things up. The bad: Right Brigade created an entire generation of suburban new hards, hahaha. Every skinny little turd of a kid decided they were going to be on the hard tip now, instead of the posi core tip. Fuck it though, at least it got a few people to stop being total wieners. And in the long run, it might have been worth dealing with all of these little shits. Why? Because it did help make newer bands start to write thicker riffs that were more influenced by the classic NYHC bands than some of the really cheesy lower echelon of the positive hardcore bands. I think we need both kinds of hardcore, and Right Brigade, along with the Floorpunch dudes’ stories on messageboards like the Rev board and the Mullet board (haha), really turned kids on to a whole slew of stuff that they probably wouldn’t have ever really started listening to. Examples: Cro-Mags, Outburst, Raw Deal/Killing Time, Breakdown, and hell, even making it “cool” to like Madball again! There was this shitty period where it was totally “wack” to like Madball, which was retarded. Despite never touring or doing much of anything, I think Right Brigade was an important band of that period because of that influence they had on newer, smaller hardcore bands to play HARDcore. Plus, I still think their stuff totally rips! The first Right Brigade songs on vinyl were on the split with A Poor Excuse on Bridge Nine Records. I really feel like this was the true beginning of the B9 Records we know today. They released this Right Brigade split 7″, and then shortly thereafter the first American Nightmare 7″. These were the two most talked about bands in that 2000-2001 time period since In My Eyes was calling it quits (and Bane was already kind of an established “bigger” band). Prior to this B9 had released other local stuff like Tenfold, Sum of All Fears, Proclamation, and The Trust 7″ (which was dope!), but the releases by Right Brigade and American Nightmare felt a lot different. It really gave everyone the feeling that B9 was going to become the new top dog. The pre-orders for this 7″ took forever to come out, because there were several problems with the covers getting printed. So there ended up being a bunch of limited covers – so much so, that the black vinyl with regular cover became kind of a rarity, haha! The first limited cover was a rip-off of the Iron Cross “Hated And Proud” 7″, mine is #9/69. The next limited cover was the “Boston Invasion” cover made for a weekend of shows with Right Brigade, American Nightmare, and In My Eyes. Now that is a sweet lineup! This weekend was just two shows – one in Maine, one in DC. Talk about a brutal weekend of driving… From Boston up to Maine, Maine down to D.C., and then all the way back up to Boston! I’m thinking No Justice might have even played the D.C. show too, which makes the lineup even more sick! I could be wrong about No Justice playing it though. Anyway, these “Boston Invasion” covers are out of 150, mine is #54/150. The covers still didn’t get finished, so Chris Wrenn (B9) made these “Custom Printing of San Diego, CA Can FUCK OFF!” covers, out of 100 copies. The back of the cover explains the delay in covers and various mistakes by “Custom Printing of San Diego, CA”. Eventually the covers finally came in, so the few black copies that were left did get covers. But there are only 181 on black vinyl with regular covers, which is kind of funny. The pre-orders got yellow vinyl, mine is #37/152 on the dust sleeve. There was also red vinyl for those that ordered more than one copy, mine is #13/355. I got both of the yellow and red copies via direct pre-order from Bridge 9. I spent the next 2 or 3 months after this 7″ came out scouring trade lists and messageboard posts, and eventually got all of the limited covers by trading with others on the east coast who had bought them at shows. The 1st pressing sold out really quickly, largely because most of them had been easy to sell as limited covers at shows, haha. So it wasn’t long before B9 did a 2nd press – the “piss and water pressing” (or was it “beer and water?”), which was 250 on clear, 750 on gold. After a while there was a 3rd pressing on white vinyl, out of 350. I bought all of these direct from B9 as they got released. I got my test pressing sometime around 2007 in an epic trade with my Italian buddy, Giampaolo Billia. In the trade, I received this RB/APE split 7″ test pressing #9/25, an original Project X 7″ on Schism (with hand-written labels that say “I was straightedge before you heard Sex Pistols!” haha), a Mouthpiece 7″ on clear with “Increase The Grease” stamp out of only 50 copies, and a one-of-a-kind turquoise American Nightmare demo 7″ (blue vinyl is already rare out of 30, but this one is more unique). Paolo and I have been trading records for nearly 12 years now. He once showed me around Rome back in 2002 when I was on a backpacking trip through Europe! He’s an awesome dude, and I hope to hang out with him again sometime – this time with his wife and children!

The back of the test pressing cover.

The back of the “Iron Cross rip-off” cover.

The back of the “Boston Invasion” cover. AN, IME, and RB – sick shows!

The back of the “Custom Printing Can FUCK OFF” covers, out of 100. There is a description of the delays with the covers. C Wrenn was heated! haha.

The 1st pressing red and yellow copies have stamped dust sleeves. Yellow out of 152 and red out of 355.

B9R-7  American Nightmare – “s/t” 7″

I made an in-depth American Nightmare blog entry that you may want to read, if interested. The following is an excerpt from it… Growing up in the small Northern California town of Oroville, CA, my best friend Zach Harlan and I made buddies with all the hardcore dudes in Redding, CA. I remember when Azy and Jesse from Redding moved to Boston, they sent word back via Rusty, Duane, Skones, and the guys that they were starting a band with Tim from Ten Yard Fight. It took a while to materialize, but after a bit the American Nightmare demo popped up. Things moved quickly from there. It seemed like every time the band played a new area on the East Coast for the first time, there would be a bunch of crazy posts on the Rev board about it. I thought the demo was kinda rough, and I wasn’t sure how into it I was. Then came the announcement that this label Bridge 9 was going to release a 7″. I always thought Bridge 9 was cool because I liked their straightedge shirts. Zach had this banana yellow shirt with little japanese character dudes on it, Dragon Ball Z style. Shit was cool. haha. I also thought the Trust 7″ was totally sweet (and still do!), so I was interested on the prospect of the new AN 7″ on B9.

Summer came and B9 released 300 early copies of the AN 7″ for a short East Coast tour they were doing. The A-side label is shown above. I had one of the guys in NJ that I had a little agreement with (they’d buy me East Coast stuff, I’d buy them CA stuff) pick me up that limited “Please Die!” tour pressing on blue. I had moved away to San Luis Obispo, CA for college, but I remember I had them mail it to my mom’s address in Oroville, CA because I knew I would be going home for the summer.

The NJ dude(s) came through, and when I arrived home for summer, the AN 7″ arrived shortly thereafter. My copy was #231/300, numbered on the “Please Die!” b-side. I remember throwing it on, not expecting a ton. I was instantly pumped. It was so much faster than I expected it to be, and Wes’s vocals were so eclectic, different than anything else going on at the time in that sub genre of hardcore. I drove over to Chico and was trying to get Zach and my friend Tim pumped on it. They were kinda hesitant, thinking it was probably some hype type stuff. I eventually got Zach to check it out and he really liked it. Somehow we got ahold of the CD version of the record, which had the bonus track – Farewell. That song was fucking brilliant. Wes and Standhard’s dueling vocals at the end, shit was so sick. Like everyone else, we got pumped on AN.

Prior to receiving the tour pressing, I had already put in a pre-order with B9 for the AN 7″. From the beginning with B9, Chris always hooked me up when I would snail mail pre-order stuff, because I’d been picking up records since the Proclamation 7″. Initially I think I had pre-ordered 2 copies of the AN 7″, so Chris sent me red vinyl out of 152 and white vinyl out of 355, the 2 most limited colors. The red vinyl had a special stamped number, mine is #63/152. I liked the 7″ so much I ordered another one to get the blue copy out of 500.

Not only was the music fucking sweet, but the packaging was like nothing I’d seen before on a 7″! The front cover opened in the middle, and it had this cool little sliding sleeve that held the cover closed (the “American Nightmare” piece shown above slides up and down, and actually comes off).

The layout itself featured this great painting of a distressed American flag. You could tell that Bridge Nine really went all out with the packaging of this 7″, and it made a huge impression on everyone. I think that was such a good idea, because it instantly made you take a step back and realize B9 was now a major “player” in this new modern hardcore era. B9’s “profile” as a label was instantly quadrupled over night.

From there the band got really popular, and by the time they did that Back To School Jam version on grey vinyl at the end of the summer, people were going bonkers. I don’t remember who I bribed to pick me up a copy at the BTSJ show in the Boston area, but luckily someone got me one. Mine is #78/250 – oddly enough, the 78 was written upside down when they were hand-numbering the labels, haha. So up to that point I was pretty current on the AN 7″ pressing. In the fall of 2000, AN announced they’d be flying out to CA for a few shows during the winter. I was bumming hard because I knew I was going to be home on Christmas break in Oroville, whereas if I’d been in San Luis Obispo it would be centrally located to catch the Bakersfield, Ojai, Santa Cruz, and Gilman shows! The day before their first show in Bakersfield, I said “fuck it”, and decided I’d drive the 8 hours to Bakersfield and just follow the tour around. I called Lucas, who was living in LA and playing drums in Carry On at the time, and he said he’d ride back to Chico/Oroville with me if I drove all the way down there. He wanted to come hang out with Zach, Tim, and I, and then he’d take a bus home to Vancouver, BC for a bit. I picked up this kid Chris Jones on the way down to that first show in Bakersfield (Chris Jones filled in on drums in Carry On for a few shows and pulled some crazy shit which ended up making those bogus Carry On GB covers legendary – I’m sure I’ll write about that when I get around to my Carry On vinyl post). Man, that show in Bakersfield was fucking sick! It was at Jerry’s Pizza, which had this brick basement that was super long and narrow. It would get so hot and crazy down there. You barely had room to move, and you’d inevitably scrape up your hands on the exposed brick walls when you were thrashing around. AN had set up their merch, and I was pumped on the two tour shirts – one with a straight razor, one with a gun on the front, but with different back prints. So I bought em both! I also picked up the infamous AN varsity hoodie with red lettering that night. Carry On played that night, as they always did, and Givens, Leighton, me, and all the regulars went nuts. It felt like we had something to prove – like, the west coast always got a bad wrap, ya know? We wanted to show these dudes who’d finally come here from the east coast that Carry On was the shit. It wasn’t in a confrontational or competitive way, it was like, we wanted to share this little secret we had in CA. They finally believed us. You could see Standhard, Chris Wrenn, Tim, Wes, all the dudes were impressed. Then when AN started playing, the room went bonkers. You could instantly tell that there had been so much anticipation for this show all summer and fall. It was like a flurry, it felt like they only played for like 3 minutes (maybe they did, I think they only had 7 songs at that time, haha). When all was done, I was so pumped I’d driven down for the shows, and was looking forward to more. That night I met Chris Wrenn from Bridge 9, and I thought it was so cool that he recognized my name, knew what I had ordered from him over the years, and was really friendly to me. It wasn’t like a “star fucker” type thing, it was just comfortable and cool and friendly, and I thought it was rad that he’d taken notice enough to know who I was, even though I didn’t do a band or whatever, etc. Anyway, fast forward a couple of days to the Santa Cruz, CA show. All of my friends from both SoCal and NorCal were there at the Vet’s Hall basement, it was a cool vibe. At some point during the show, I’m standing inside to stay out of the cold, and Lucas comes in grinning from ear to ear, and says he wants to go outside to talk. We go outside, and he tells me that Chris Wrenn had just met with the Carry On dudes in the van and asked them to be part of Bridge 9. They would be flying to Boston and recording an LP for B9 in 2001. B9 was still a very small label, but they seemed to be doing all the right things, and it just felt exciting. Carry On had really stepped it up with their Roll With The Punches 7″, and it was time for an album. I remember Todd and Ryan being so stoked that night, everything just felt good. I was so fucking pumped for them, and for all of us in our little crew really, haha! Carry On was finally going to get the east coast to pay attention to them. Ok ok, I know this is an AN post, not a Carry On post, but this all seemed relevant to the story explaining how these records came to me.

So, eventually I got wind of the clear vinyl “friends press” and I always really wanted one. It took me awhile because they weren’t really things you get could get very easily unless you were super close with one of the current band members. Then during the Spring of 2001, Carry On went out to Boston to record their LP at God City. Todd Jones called me on the phone one night after one of their recording sessions, telling me he’d gotten one of those clear copies from Wes and he’d sell it to me because he didn’t really collect vinyl. He also asked me if I wanted him to pick me up anything else cause Wes was selling some of his personal stash. He asked me if I wanted a test pressing, so I was able to buy one from Wes via Todd for a very reasonable price. I was really thankful that he’d called me to check to see if I wanted anything. Todd has been a really good friend to me over the years, in lots of different ways, and that was an example of something that always made me appreciate his friendship.

When Todd came home from recording, it was a while before we could meet up because he lived in the LA area and I was in San Luis Obispo. One weekend Voegtli, James, and I decided to go visit Jeff Givens in Simi Valley for the weekend. Givens’ parents had like the hangout pad. Pool, basketball, like 3 refrigerators stocked full of food, and they always let a billion of us come over and hang. Being the VP of something at Budweiser had definitely paid off for the family! His dad used to give us all shit because we were all straightedge and he needed our generation to buy beer!! hahaha. Todd came over one evening and brought me the records.

I was pumped, my AN collection was now complete. My clear vinyl friends press is #70/100, and is personalized to Todd Jones. My test pressing is #24/27. Later on, the black vinyl copies came out, with and without drummer cover, so I picked those up via B9. There were 900 with regular covers, 600 with drummer cover. Oh, I never did get a “mosh camp”, so that’s not depicted here. The real ones came with red vinyl and had blue covers, I think. Word was that some of the real ones did have yellow covers, but who knows. Honestly, I just never wanted one of these things unless it was gonna be cheap. They seemed so easy to bootleg, and more and more seemed to pop up over the years because of that. I just wasn’t very interested…

Close-up of the AN “s/t” 7″ test pressing label.

Here’s a promo poster for the first AN 7″.

B9R-8  Ten Yard Fight – “The Only Way Video 1995-1999” VHS:  I never owned this VHS, but there were 100 white VHS tapes and 900 blue VHS tapes.

B9R-9  American Nightmare – “The Sun Isn’t Getting Any Brighter” 7″

I pre-ordered the 2nd AN 7″ via snail mail from B9 and Chris hooked me up again! He sent me a copy on orange vinyl, the 2nd one shown above, to be exact. There were only going to be 100 copies of any colored vinyl for this release, so this orange version was very sought after.

Here’s a little note that Chris Wrenn included in the pre-order package. Most orange vinyl went to friends and locals, with very few going out via pre-order, so I was pretty pumped that he sent me one. Instead of colored vinyl, B9 decided to do colored labels. So there were 150 with red labels, 350 white labels, and 500 blue labels – exactly matching the pressing info of the first 7″ on colored vinyl, which I always thought was a cool idea. I had pre-ordered like 3 7″s, so I think I got the red labels and white labels too. I placed another order to get the blue labels. As for the 2nd orange copy I have… Many years later, I remember my buddy Lucas (drums in Carry On and Go It Alone) telling me that when they had been out there recording the Carry On record, the Boston dudes had mentioned that the orange vinyl copies were about half bright orange and the other half were a really light creamsicle color. I always thought I’d like to get a really light color. A couple of years back, Scott Roseberry was selling a light orange copy, so I bought it from him.

Somewhere along the line I got the 1st pressing silver labels with black ink out of 900, as well as the 2nd pressing black labels with silver ink out of 1,000. These are pretty impossible to tell the difference unless you compare them side by side. The 1st pressing silver labels is on the left (though this pic makes the labels look almost white). The silver is more dull, and the black isn’t quite solid because it’s ink. The 2nd pressing black labels is on the right, with metallic silver ink so the silver appears a little brighter and sparkles a bit.

The purple copy was sold on a Euro tour, and to be honest I don’t remember how I got it. I probably just did a trade with a euro kid for some other tour pressing here in the U.S. It has special “Fall 2001 European Tour labels”. It was kind of a bummer that they pressed this on purple vinyl, because I liked the fact that the only colored vinyl for this entire release was the 100 on orange vinyl to represent “The Sun”. But, the dark feel of the purple looks nice too, so at least they didn’t do a bunch of ugly colors. You have to hold it up to the light to really notice it’s purple anyway – laying on a table it looks almost black.

The last copy on the bottom right hand corner of the main photo was silver labels again, but has a small “IV” on the label underneath the B9 logo to denote the 4th pressing, out of 1,500 copies. I showed a close-up above. B9 did these as a final pressing, and I bought it directly from them. When I started Rivalry and we started doing a lot of 2nd and 3rd pressings of things, I shamelessly stole this idea. I didn’t want to over-do different colored vinyl, but I wanted to preserve a way to denote first vs. second vs. third pressings. So if the “main” color of the first pressing was white vinyl, I’d do the second pressing as all white vinyl as well, but the label would have a little “II” on the label. Thanks for the idea, Chris! 🙂

Just showing the inside and outside of “The Sun Isn’t Getting Any Brighter” 7″ layout. The “AN angel” ended up being kind of a classic piece of artwork in the 2000’s era of modern hardcore. It was also interesting that the band’s name didn’t really appear on this record anywhere.

These screen-printed posters were made for a Bridge 9 triple record release show in Providence, RI on March 18, 2001. The records released were AN “The Sun” 7″, Shark Attack “Blood In The Water” 7″ (B9 version), and Death Threat – “Peace And Security” LP. The posters feature original artwork by Linas Garsys and are hand-numbered out of 120 and signed by Linas at the bottom. The poster on the left is obviously Shark Attack, the middle is Death Threat, the right is American Nightmare. These things are so fucking sick!! They are framed together and hang on the wall in my home. My friends Sarah Clark and Walter Yetman picked these up for me when they lived out on the East Coast during this period. Oddly enough, these framed copies hanging on my wall are actually Sarah’s copies. She is the one that got them framed, and they used to hang in her old place, but they don’t really fit well in her current place. I was talking about how much I liked hers and wanted to get mine framed to hang in my house. She offered to let me borrow these indefinitely until a time when she had more room to hang them up again. So someday when she takes these back, I’m going to have to get off my ass and get mine framed too!

Around this 2000-2002 period, Linas and Robby Redcheeks were doing a lot of these screen-printed posters. Here’s another one for a show in Philly with American Nightmare, Count Me Out, Striking Distance, etc. I wish that I had the “Sid and Nancy” ones from the Adult Crash show! I never got those but I want em!

B9R-10  Death Threat – “Peace And Security” LPThere was only one pressing of the Death Threat LP:  40 spray painted plastic sleeves with blue vinyl for the record release show at the Met Cafe on March 18, 2001, and then 150 on grey vinyl and 810 on blue vinyl.  When this LP came out, I felt like Death Threat was totally a “love em or hate em” type band.  Probably 30% of my friends absolutely loved them and listened to nothing but Death Threat and would travel 3,000 miles to see them play. The other 70% of my friends hated Death Threat and clowned on them with obligatory jokes of “pirate core” and things like that.  I guess I always kind of liked Death Threat, because of my close friends that were so fanatical about this album – Jeff Givens, Todd Jones, Chris Voegtli, Kelsey Yates, Timpac Brooks, Daniel Sant, and probably a bunch of others.  I did think it was kind of cool that B9 was releasing this album, because at this point in Death Threat’s life, they were definitely a band that played in a segregated “thug core” type scene.  So it was cool to see that Bridge 9, a label that tended to be associated with straight forward or “positive” hardcore, was willing to work with any band that they liked.  That’s what a DIY label is supposed to be!  This album was technically just a licensing deal for B9, because the CD was on Triple Crown Records.  But over time, I think most people have kinda gravitated to considering the “Peace And Security” LP a “Bridge 9 release”.

Here’s the spray painted plastic sleeve made for the record release show on March 18, 2001 at the Met Cafe.  Only 40 copies were made.  Chris Wrenn hooked me up as always, sending me one of these in the mail with my pre-order!  Fuck yeah!  Since there were only 40 of them, and they were made for a record release show, I can’t imagine that very many kids got this as a pre-order.

The grey vinyl out of 150 is a cool looking record.  When you first pull it out, it looks almost black.  But if you look at it from an angle, you see a bunch of subtle swirl colors to it, which gives it a charcoal color.

B9R-11  Shark Attack – “Blood In The Water” 7″I picked up both Shark Attack 7″ test pressings from Tru Pray a couple years ago when he was raising some money for some surgeries for his little bulldog, Chainsaw. I hit him up directly and bought these and a couple of Mouthpiece records from him, avoiding all the hassle of eBay and getting him the money he needed quick. I hope it helped out his little guy! Originally the first Shark Attack 7″ was pressed on vocalist, Matt Summers’, own record Label, My War Records. You can see an original My War pressing with silver labels in the upper right hand corner. It was just a small quick press of ~400-500 copies I think. People got interested in this band quick, and Bridge 9 quickly repressed the 7″ on grey, red, and black vinyl. B9 used the same pressing plates, so there were no new test pressings made for the B9 release. The band did a show in Allentown, PA and put “Fuck Philly” stamps on the dust sleeves of 60 copies because there was another big show in Philly happening that night. I think you had to have your show ticket to get the 7″ or something. Anyway, somehow my copy ended up with two Blacklist Booking ticket things, numbered out of 60. Not sure where the second one belongs to. The only B9 pressing not shown here is 1st pressing black vinyl with red labels out of 1500 because I sold it before taking this photo. You do see the 2nd pressing with white labels out of 1000. Quite a bit later, Shark Attack released a “Feeding Frenzy” demo tape that had some new songs. Reflections Records released a CD that had all of the Shark Attack material on it, but the band’s members were starting to fizzle out. So Matt Summers pressed 300 copies of the Feeding Frenzy 7″, and you got it for free by pre-ordering the CD from My War Records. Back then we used to mail cash or money orders via snail mail. Even in 1999/2000 we weren’t doing a ton of paypal stuff. The Feeding Frenzy test press in the lower left hand corner has cool custom hand-drawn Linas art that didn’t appear on any of the 7″s, so that is pretty cool.

The original My War pressing out of 400 copies.

This photo compares the My War vs. Bridge 9 pressing. The red ink on the cover of the My War is much brighter than the more burgundy color on the B9 release. And the labels are obviously very different.

Another angle…

Close-up of the Fuck Philly stamp and Blacklist Booking ticket(s).

The second (and final) Shark Attack 7″, out of only 300 copies, and only available by pre-ordering the “discography” CD. This was not a Bridge 9 release, but I included it here just for fun.

On the left is the original “Blood In The Water” demo, before it was released on 7″. On the right is the demo tape for “Feeding Frenzy” before it was released as a 7″ out of 300 copies only.

B9R-12  Breaker Breaker – “Demo Y2X1”There was only one pressing of this 7″: 30 on black with Che Fest cover, 50 on clear with red labels, 150 on clear with white labels, and 1500 on black vinyl.  The B9 discography says there were 8 test pressings, but I’ve honestly never seen a single copy for trade or sale.  Breaker Breaker was a cool band from San Francisco that was started by my friend Rusty from Redding, CA, along with some guys he’d met when he moved to SF.  I spent a lot of time hanging out with this band, and that is how I met my friend Mark Kelley (vocalist).  Breaker Breaker wasn’t around very long.  They put out this demo, played quite a few shows during the spring and summer of 2001, and actually recorded another EP for Bridge Nine.  Shortly thereafter, they broke up, so B9 was not really willing to put money into pressing a record for a band that had broken up.  Luckily the “Out Of Service” EP did end up coming out on Martyr Records, but it was CD only, no vinyl.  It’s unfortunate that more people didn’t get to hear the “Out Of Service” EP.  I actually think it was awesome, and every time one of the songs plays on my iPod when I have it on random, I get pumped and throw on the whole 6 song EP.

This is a cool photo from a weekend in May 2001 when my buddy John Eightclip and I rode up to Seattle with Breaker Breaker for a weekend of 3 shows with Champion.  We spent the weekend doing all sorts of cool shit around the Seattle area, the coolest being a baseball game with BxB vs. Champion/Seattle.  Me in the front left giving the obligatory west coast sign, Breaker Breaker dudes all around me, Rusty Munro (BxB) and Jim Hesketh (Champion) bottom right, Todd Preboski (Champion) above Mark Kelley (BxB), John Eightclip and Chris Williams (Champion) bro hugging in the middle, Timm McIntosh (Champion) to their right giving another bro hug, and I think that is Aram in the NY hat in the back.  But that is weird because I don’t remember him ever wearing baseball caps, haha.  That weekend generated this stupid inside joke with me, Eightclip, the Breaker Breaker dudes, and Timm McIntosh, where we always yelled “Are you trying to fuck me off?” at people.  Eightclip and I still say that shit to this day, haha!

The back cover of the Che Fest cover, out of 30.

Comparing the clear vinyl copies, 50 on clear with red labels vs. 150 on clear with white labels.  The clear with red labels were really only given to friends, so it was kind of hard to find these things. I got mine from Rusty when I was at his house one day.

The layout was a glued pocket cover, with this insert.

Just for fun, I threw in a photo of the original demo cassette tape.  The red tape looks dope.

One more little extra… Treason featured Mark Kelley (Breaker Breaker vocalist) on vocals, Connor Spencer (Lights Out vocalist) on drums, and I believe it was Kevin Williams (Lights Out bassist) on bass, and our friend Zane on guitar (early Never Healed guitarist). This was a cool demo with 30 second blasters, super distorted vocals, and some electronic stuff happening. They only played 2 or 3 shows, but it had some cool potential.

B9R-13  Cops And Robbers – “Execution Style” 7″Only one pressing:  150 on blue, 350 on white, 1500 on black.  I’m guessing the artwork was an original Linas Garsys drawing.  It looks like his stuff that he was drawing around this era of hardcore.

The layout was a glued pocket cover, with this insert.

B9R-14  The Hope Conspiracy – “File: 03″ 7”B9 released a single by The Hope Conspiracy and they did a bunch of cool things with the vinyl.  All but 100 copies were only one-sided 7″s that had an etching or a screen print on the b-side.  The first copy shown above is one of the 100 copies that had music on both sides.  The stamp on the dust sleeve says “Jan 30”.  They used a date stamper to number these, so mine is #30…  Number 58 would be “Feb 28”, and so on.  The two bonus songs on the B-side were the Hope Con songs from their split with Jesus Eater.  These are almost impossible to find because they were pretty much just given to friends, etc.  I got mine from Todd Jones.  He brought it home and gave it to me as a gift after Carry On flew to Boston to record their “A Life Less Plagued” LP.  He knew that I collected all the B9 stuff, so that was really cool of him to give it to me.  The clear vinyl out of 150 did not have an etching on the b-side because they wanted to be able to screen print the original artwork by Linas Garsys.  These look awesome!  The maroon vinyl out of 500 and the black vinyl out of 1500 have an etching scratched into the b-side of that same artwork that was screen printed on the clear vinyl.  All in all, this was a really sweet 7″ package with a lot of cool surprises going on.  It was cool shit like this that really made everyone realize B9 was becoming the hardcore label.

Close-up of the screen printed b-side on the clear vinyl copies, out of 150. Like I said, this is awesome!

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-15  The Hope Conspiracy – “File: 03” CDEP

B9R-16  No Warning – “s/t” CD

B9R-17  Panic – “Dying For It” 7″Panic was started when Gibby from The Trouble got together with Azy and Jesse, two dudes who were originally part of the crew of kids from Redding, CA.  Azy and Jesse had moved to Boston in 1998, and actually started American Nightmare, but they weren’t in AN for much longer than the demo era.  Their new band, Panic, was definitely a sweet band that contributed to the cool vibe of the early B9 roster.  There was only one pressing – 150 on green vinyl, 400 on yellow/blue split vinyl, and 1500 on black vinyl.  The yellow/blue split vinyl was particularly cool because this was pretty much the first time I’d seen a hardcore label do some of  this split vinyl that only Erika Records could do.  Other pressing plants like United and Rainbo didn’t have the machinery to do the split vinyl, and most labels didn’t use Erika Records because they charged a lot more than United and Rainbo, even for regular black vinyl.

I also owned a test pressing of the Panic “Dying For It” 7″, but I sold it last year. As mentioned above, this was pressed at Erika Records because B9 wanted to do that cool split yellow/blue vinyl.

A letter from B9 that came with my Panic 7″ pre-order.  Notice it mentions B9 working with Stop And Think, which definitely never materialized.  It also mentions the Breaker Breaker 2nd EP, which never came out on B9 because the band broke up (but Martyr Records did release it).  The screen printed poster with original Linas Garsys artwork that is mentioned is shown below.

A screen printed poster with original Linas Garsys artwork. These were given away free to everyone who pre-ordered both the Panic 7″ and Breathe In LP.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

Just for fun, I included a photo of the original demo cassette tape too.

B9R-18  Over My Dead Body / Death Threat – “Split” 7″I remember my friend Daniel Sant (vocalist of OMDB) being so stoked when he found out Over My Dead Body was going to be doing a split with one of his favorite hardcore bands, Death Threat, on the most up and coming hardcore label, Bridge 9 Records.  D Sant definitely fell into the crowd of “Death Threat lover”.  This 7″ had quite a few pressings. The 1st pressing was 15 test pressings (mine is #5/15), 300 on solid yellow, 700 on green.  There were two different photo-copied record release covers, one for each band’s separate record release shows, both on green vinyl out of 100.  I can’t remember which band had the red vs. the white cover, but they’re basically the same.  So there are actually only 500 on green with regular cover.  The 2nd pressing was 1,000 on gold vinyl (transparent yellow), and the 3rd pressing was 1,000 on blue vinyl.  The final and 4th press was 250 on red vinyl with spray painted labels.  I bought my red vinyl copy from the B9 table at the last Positive Numbers Festival in 2005.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-19  Carry On – “A Life Less Plagued” LP

My favorite vinyl blog entry that I’ve ever done is the Carry On entry, so if you’re a fan, you will definitely want to check that out for a personal account of traveling and hanging out with Carry On. Everything below is an excerpt from that entry. Carry On is my favorite hardcore band of all time. I didn’t say they were the “best” or “most influential” hardcore band of all time or anything like that – I said they are my favorite hardcore band of all time. If you don’t know me, or you’re not from California, you’re probably thinking “wtf” right about now, yeah? That’s OK, you don’t know what this means… And you never fucking did. Haha, I’m just kidding. Ryan used to always tack on ”…and you never fucking did” at shows when he would sing the “you don’t know what this means” line at the end of the song. But anyway, here’s the simple truth: Carry On was my “Salad Days”. They were the band I hung out with, traveled with, lived and breathed during my most formative years from 18-22, and nothing will ever change that. They were playing straight edge hardcore that I could identify with, a style that was pretty dormant in California. They were hardcore for me and my friends. They were a polarizing band, especially here in California, and that only made all of us in the crew that much closer. We were young, and we were pissed off, and Carry On was a way we were able to express ourselves. We all did all sorts of ignorant things during that time period, but I feel like all of that was necessary for us to vent, learn, and grow. More so than any other band around me at that time, they adopted a group of us as pseudo band members. So much so that we adopted them back, almost giving a feeling of ownership of a band that we didn’t even play in. Carry On was our band. It was all our effort, it was all our blood. And you know what? These feelings still haven’t faded… In April of 2001, Carry On flew out to Boston to record their LP at God City. If I remember correctly, it was just Ryan, Todd, Corey, and Lucas – I think Graham had quit the band and either Todd and/or Corey recorded the bass on the album. I remember while they were out there, Todd called me on the phone one night after one of their recording sessions, telling me he’d gotten one of those clear vinyl “friend’s press” copies of the American Nightmare 7″ from Wes and he’d sell it to me because he didn’t really collect vinyl. He also asked me if I wanted him to pick me up anything else cause Wes was selling some of his personal stash. He asked me if I wanted a test pressing, so I was able to buy a test pressing of the first American Nightmare 7″ from Wes via Todd for a very reasonable price. I was really thankful that he’d called me to check to see if I wanted anything. Todd has been a really good friend to me over the years, in lots of different ways, and that was an example of something that always made me appreciate his friendship. Anyway, the first time I heard the Carry On LP was one weekend when Voegtli, James, and I decided to go visit Jeff Givens in Simi Valley for the weekend. Givens’ parents had like the hangout pad. Pool, basketball, like 3 refrigerators stocked full of food, and they always let a billion of us come over and hang. It was not uncommon for me, Chris Voegtli, James Gianello, Brian Kean, Jeff Leighton, Marko, Todd Jones, Pat Beltran (RIP), Pat Chapman, and Matt Bowles to be over there at any one time. Being the VP of something at Budweiser had definitely paid off for the family. His dad used to give us all shit because we were all straightedge and he needed our generation to buy beer!! hahaha. So that weekend, Todd came over one evening and brought me those AN records that he’d gotten me on the east coast, and he had a burned rough-mix copy of “A Life Less Plagued” with him. We listened to it together, and obviously it’s hard to pick up on things the first time through with a bunch of friends around, but I distinctly remember four things that we were all psyched on. The first was obviously “the hardest kids still put an X by their fucking name”! The second was the fact that Sweet Pete did guest vox on the re-recorded version of the “Roll With The Punches”. The third was that part: “What happened to the times? Where we’d stay up all night? We’d fucking fight! And we’d fight and we’d fight and we’d fight.” – we all thought that sounded cool. And the fourth was quite simply – “yo, the fucking mosh part on songs #2 and #6 are ridiculous”. Those parts always made me go bonkers, and they still do. Todd really out-did himself on this record with the song writing, and I feel like he established himself as one of the best hardcore song writers around, period. Todd and Corey did an awesome job with the recording of the guitars, they sound really thick and aggressive. And the bass sounds really driving on this record, it isn’t all bouncy and shit. The tone is awesome – it’s sludgy and sounds dope with the speed and the mosh parts. Ryan’s vocal delivery sounded fucking awesome. And I was super proud of my friend Lucas – he had always wanted to record a full length hardcore album, and his drums sounded fucking on-point on this record. It was such a huge step up from everything else they had all done, and it was an appropriate full length with all the ingredients. You had a couple 30 second bangers (#1 and #5: “The View” and “Mirrors And Needles”), those hard ass mosh parts in songs #2 (“Waiting On Forever”), #6 (“Is This All There is?”), and #10 (“Off My Chest”), a unique long song with interesting song structure (title track, #7 “A Life Less Plagued”), emotional songs with melody (#3 “Killing A Sound” and #9 “So Much Of You”), songs with catchy lyrics (#4 “Roll With The Punches: Sweet Pete on ‘so X your first show me what’s left inside'”, #8 “X’s Always Win: the hardest kids…” and #11 “Broken Strings: and we’d fight and we’d fight and we’d fight”) and a classic album end-er with a special nod to Jordan Johnson by using a guitar riff that Jordan originally wrote (#12 “Rethinking”). That actually covers all of the songs right there, numbers one through twelve, and they all add something special to the album – there is no filler. The song that impressed me the most was “So Much Of You”, just because Todd had never really let us hear a more emotional sounding song that sounded like that. That was really outside the box of what I would expect him to write, and the fact that he did, and that he did it so well – that was super impressive and it made me realize the talent that he had. It’s no surprise then that he’s gone on to tackle almost every genre of hardcore, and do it better than most: straight up hardcore with Carry On, heavy ass hardcore with Terror, melodic hardcore with Betrayed, and most recently gnarly gloomy speed metal with Nails. I was so stoked on “A Life Less Plagued”, but man, it didn’t seem like this album was ever going to finally come out… The wait between April when they recorded the album and the record release in October seemed like forrrrrever! A few things changed during that time period – namely, their drummer Lucas left the band after recording. It had just gotten really difficult for him to stay in L.A. Being a Canadian, he couldn’t really get a job in the U.S., and he really just couldn’t afford to spend so much time living in California anymore. So he went home for good to Vancouver, BC. They were also still missing a bass player since Graham had quit. There was a very brief period where Jeff Neumann from In My Eyes started playing bass in Carry On. I think he moved out to California shortly after In My Eyes played their final shows in October of 2000. He must have started playing in Carry On sometime in the Spring of 2001, because I know Graham was definitely on that trip to Seattle in February 2001, but Graham did not record with them in April 2001. Anyway, the thing with Jeff Neumann really didn’t last long at all – maybe he moved or something, I don’t remember. There was definitely a period earlier in Carry On where they had played as a 4 piece sometimes, with Corey on bass, but I know Corey hated it. So then Jon Westbrook played a show or two on bass (and also later played guitar on the East Coast Tour in October 2001). Basically, the bass position was always a revolving door in Carry On after Josh Luce left the band. In the end, they ended up recruiting two kids that most of us didn’t really know at the time to play in Carry On – Greg Bacon on bass, and Nick Jett on drums. Everyone spent that summer, anxiously awaiting the release of the LP. This was a big deal for Bridge 9 – everything else on B9 had been 7″ EP’s. American Nightmare was doing their full length on Equal Vision, and the Carry On LP was going to be B9’s first real full length recording (since the Death Threat LP was really a vinyl license from Triple Crown). From day one when Chris Wrenn signed Carry On that night on the first AN west coast trip, he told them that he had planned for Carry On to be the Bridge 9 band, the main focus for increasing the profile of his label. For that point in his label’s life, he went all out on spending for the recording, the advertising, and printing that big poster which was pictured up above. Bottom line, the you could tell the Carry On LP was a big deal to him, to them, and to his label.

That summer there was a show at 924 Gilman St. in Berkeley, CA, and our friend Allison Murdock took this photo. I’ve always loved this photo, because it’s got me stage diving and Jim Hesketh from Champion singing along. You can also see my current roommate of 5 years Aaron Menesez (O.G. hardcore kid from Atascadero, CA) singing along up front (far background, kind of under Ryan’s armpit), as well as my best friend since kindergarten and Rivalry Records co-founder, Zach Harlan, singing along just under Jim (Zach is kind of hidden behind the blonde headed kid in the foreground). I must say, a photo full of crucial dudes.

Here’s another photo from that same show. Chris Williams from Champion piling on, Duane Harris from Some Still Believe (and eventually Allegiance) right behind him, me singing along while taking a breather on the side, my (ex-)girlfriend Isa to my right, and John Eightclip’s then-girlfriend-now-wife Gaelyn filming the show. Towards the end of summer, all sorts of rumors starting swirling around Carry On. Particularly regarding Ryan breaking his edge, doing some heavy drugs, etc etc. Their LP was slated to come out in October 2001, and they did a string of shows on the East Coast in October in support of the release. The rumors really started flying around then. It sucks that these personal things were so public, but I guess that’s just what happens in a “small world” type scene, especially if you’ve been outspoken about any particular subject like straightedge. Everyone always wants to have an opinion and talk about juicy gossip, even if they don’t know the people involved, and it’s that much worse in a scene full of 15-20 year old kids. Next up was the double record release show with Carry On and Over My Dead Body at the Ojai Women’s Club. That show was particularly cool for me… First off, all of my friends and their bands were playing that night! Some Still Believe, Breaker Breaker, Diehard Youth, Carry On, and Over My Dead Body. Secondly, my band, The Damage Done, was going to hop up and play our first hardcore show that night! Me and all my best friends – Nick Koets, James Gianello, Chris Voegtli, and Dave Copp – had started our band in San Luis Obispo that summer, and Jeremy Johnson had recorded our demo for us the month earlier. I was talking with Todd online one day and we got to talking about the demo, and I asked him if we could hop up on either the SSB or Breaker Breaker set and play 3 or 4 songs. I’ll never forget what he said – “Kyle, you know I wouldn’t do this for anyone else, right?” And trust me, he pretty much meant exactly that, haha. Todd was an abrasive dude back then man, and most people didn’t get in that inner circle – but there was this crew of us that were tight. Todd is a very loyal dude to those that stick with him and return the favor, and this was just another example. It was really special to me that he was letting us do this, because Todd ran a super tight ship when it came to booking shows with keeping them short and sweet. This was awesome for me and my band mates, to feel like we were a small part of what all of our other friends were doing in California with SSB, Breaker Breaker, Diehard Youth, Carry On, and OMDB. And it was obviously a huge hook-up to play a first show in front of that many people at a high-profile show. Todd had made us keep it a secret, so it was not announced and we didn’t tell anyone other than SSB and Breaker Breaker what we were doing (because we had to borrow their stuff). We hopped up and played a couple of songs, opening with an Insted cover – “Feel Their Pain”, my favorite vegetarian song. John Eightclip actually filmed our little set, and he recently uploaded a bunch of his old hardcore videos to YouTube!

You can see a young Dennis McDonald (shaggy hair back then) being so pumped on the cover and going apeshit, haha. Dennis is my buddy, another O.G. Central Coast kid, plus he has a Carry On panther tattoo on his arm – fuck yeah. You can see young versions of a bunch of my other friends running around in that video too – Skones (Some Still Believe, Right On), Walter Yetman, Aaron Menesez, Zack Nelson (In Control), Ryan Fredette (In Control), Jeff Givens, Zach Harlan, Chris Williams (Champion), Anthony Torres, Eli Horner (Killing The Dream), etc. Obviously looking back at this video 10 years later is kind of embarrassing – we were just a shitty little hardcore band! But this was the first time we’d ever done this, and I still think this was a pretty fucking cool first show!! I rambled on and spoke so fast you can’t even make out what I’m saying in between songs, but at 6:58 I say something to the effect of “If you don’t have any money for a demo, just come talk to me, I’ll just give you one. We just wanna give you guys another band in California to mosh to.” That pretty much summed it up. There weren’t a lot of bands doing this shit in California back then, and we just wanted to contribute. The Damage Done went on to release three 7″s, and we were never a great band, but our friends were always super supportive, and I really appreciated that.

Here’s footage from the last show The Damage Done ever played on October 4th, 2003. We asked all of our closest friend’s bands to play the show: Champion, For The Crown, Allegiance, and Lights Out. We had finally kind of learned how to do this “band thing”, and this performance is quite a bit better than the video of our first show when we didn’t know what we were doing, haha. You’ll see lots of my friend’s familiar faces singing along that would later go on to do a lot of cool things in hardcore. Little Matt Wilson from Set Your Goals has a big sing along in the first song, Eli Horner from Killing The Dream on the 3rd song, Zach Harlan (Rivalry Records) all up in the mix, Connor Spencer, Andrew Dilburger, Kevin Williams from Lights Out up front bobbin’ around, Ross Ferrar from Ceremony crawling all over people, John Eightclip from Allegiance and Brian Horwitz (Crazy-B) mashing it up, Matt McCall and Aaron Menesez from Right On singing along, Aaron’s nephew Jakob Menesez (RIP) up front too. I’d like to think that Carry On and all the bands of that era, The Damage Done included, were able to make an impression on dudes like this, and push them to try to make hardcore whatever they wanted it to be. If California wasn’t going to listen, just keep pushing forward until they can’t ignore you anymore. Look at the 300-400 people in this room? All there for straight up local California hardcore. FUCK YEAH. Anyway, back to the Carry On record release! That night was awesome, and the Ojai Women’s Club went off when Carry On played. It has an old elevated wood floor, and I remember stepping back for a second during “Off My Chest” and watching everyone stomping, it looked like that fucking floor was going to cave in. Seriously, the entire building felt like it was shaking.

Check out the record release show footage on YouTube, courtesy of John Eightclip. At 12:25 you can hear the loud ass “Off My Chest” sing-along and the stomp that ensues, haha. Also, at 4:00 in that video, you see me run across and do this cannon ball stage dive… I remember that! I jumped way out there and totally took out this poor little kid that was just chillin on the side, it sucked, haha! To make matters worse, it looks like I didn’t even help him up or anything, because 10 seconds later at 4:10 you see me hop right back up from where I landed on him and run across and do it again, this time on the other side. Haha, what a dick! That song they were playing was “Killing A Sound” (song #3 on the LP). It had been released on the “Fighting Music” compilation that summer, so it was really the only new song that I knew all that well yet, but I fucking loved it. The show was awesome, and it was fucking sweet to finally hold the LP in our hands. The only bummer about this show, which is common to all record release shows, is that of course the band wants to showcase all of their new material, but no one in the crowd really knows it yet. This album hadn’t leaked or anything, so you can see that a lot of songs look really “tame” because no one knows the stuff yet. But man, I’ll tell you what, if you watch videos of the final Carry On shows in 2005, you’ll see what things could have been like once people learned those songs. Unfortunately, this record release show was definitely the beginning of the end for Carry On. The next month in November 2001, The Damage Done traveled up to Seattle with Carry On for a weekend show. Up there it was obvious that Ryan was really disconnected from everyone else. He had his girlfriend there in the van with him, and things were just different. There are points in life where you get this feeling like it’s an “end of an era” – that night was definitely one of those points. One era was ending, and another was starting – for me personally in my own band, and a new era for California hardcore as a whole with a new crop of bands. I was sick as a dog, and I barely remember anything else about that night – I was just happy to get through our set. We stayed in Seattle at Chrissie Good’s house, and Carry On continued back to California to play this cool show at 924 Gilman St. with Limp Wrist, of all bands! haha. I remember Chris Voegtli and Zach Harlan drove back to California with Brian Horwitz that night so they could all go to the Gilman show. Crazy-B had driven all the way to Seattle on his cross-country trip back home from Boston where he had been playing juniors hockey / going to school out there! He decided to detour and come to Seattle just for this one show, so Chris and Zach just drove back down with him. Fucking crazy ass! B was/is a maniac, and he is still one of my best friends to this day. Anyway, those guys made it to the Limp Wrist / Carry On Gilman show, and Zach Harlan still talks about how cool it was, because of the mix of crowds there. It went off well, and everyone had a great time. I’m bummed I missed it, but I was just too sick and kinda chilled out for the day in Seattle and came back Sunday. I found some videos of this show on YouTube: Part 1 and Part 2.

Even though people had started to come around, even at this point in 2001 a month after their LP was out, you still really only see our crew of people – Chris Voegtli, Brian Horwitz, Jeff Leighton, and Ryan Marks moshing and singing along. It was just really hard to get kids in California to pay attention to what we were all doing. Anyway, this was about it for Carry On. If I remember right, Carry On only played one more show after that. It was in Hollywood, I believe. Things came to a head that night, and just like that, the band was over. I heard from Jeff Givens the next day that Carry On was done, and I was so fucking bummed. But I mean, I knew it was coming. Given the current state of things, it was just time to move on.

Here is my collection of “A Life Less Plagued”. There is a test pressing out of 8, orange vinyl out of 150, clear vinyl out of 400, and black vinyl out of 1400. I actually own two orange copies. One is a lighter orange (middle), and one is a very dark orange, almost red (right). Both have white swirls in them. I also have an un-opened sealed clear vinyl copy that has original artwork by Linas Garsys, out of 7 copies.

There are only 8 test pressings of “A Life Less Plagued”. Mine is personalized, simply “To Kyle, Love Todd”. Todd gave me this as a gift shortly after the band broke-up. I remember he brought it to me at a show at Pat’s Warehouse in Ventura, CA sometime in 2002. He also gave me a Hope Conspiracy File:03 7″ with the two songs from the Jesus Eater split pressed on the b-side, out of 100 copies (all other versions of that Hope Con 7″ are 1-sided). He had gotten it while he was out east at the B9 offices. Todd always looked out for me like this, so I’ll always look out for him.

Close-up of Linas’s original drawing, out of 7 copies. Each is different. He did one for each band member on that East Coast Tour in October 2001. Mine was Jon Westbrook’s copy. I got my copy in 2006 from Westbrook in a trade for a couple Rev singles.

Here is the front of my “Linas” copy.

Here’s a close-up showing the differences in my orange copies. They both have the white swirl, but the orange one on the left is definitely lighter and more transparent. The one on the right is so dark and opaque that it’s almost red.

B9R-20  Breathe In – “From This Day On” LPThere was just one pressing of the Breathe In LP – 150 on white, 300 on red, and 500 on black.  This was the other record that came out at the same time as the Panic 7″ and you got the screen-printed poster featuring original Linas Garsys artwork if you pre-ordered both records.  Breathe In was from the San Francisco Bay Area, but it was weird because none of us really knew these dudes.  They didn’t really play shows with any other hardcore bands, nor did they hang out in the same circles.  Brett Matthews who ran AMP Magazine was the main dude in Breathe In.  B9 was putting a lot of advertisements in AMP Magazine around this time, so I imagine this is how Chris Wrenn and Brett got in touch about doing a Breathe In record on B9.  As far as I remember, there was just this Breathe In demo that Brett started handed out at shows, and then a few months later this full length LP materialized on B9.  That’s kind of impressive that they went straight from demo to LP.  The LP was pretty decent, it kind of sounded like a more screamy Kid Dynamite or something?  Once the announcement came that they were on B9, they did play a few shows with Breaker Breaker, but in general Breathe In was just never really part of what the rest of us were doing in Bay Area or California hardcore.

The back cover and insert.

B9R-21  Breathe In – “Nervous Breakdown” (Black Flag cover) 7″Breathe In did a complete cover of the Black Flag “Nervous Breakdown” 7″.  Only 500 copies were pressed, and the original artwork was mimicked, all the way down to the hot pink record labels that were used on the original SST Records #1 (see my “NYHC and Classic Punk” vinyl blog entry for photos of an original Black Flag “Nervous Breakdown” 7″ on SST Records from 1978, one of the first hardcore records of all time!). 

B9R-22 Sinners and Saints – “The Sky Is Falling” CD:  This CD was awesome!  Anthony Pappalardo from In My Eyes and White Trash Rob from Blood For Blood teaming up to play some rock music.  Too bad it never came out on vinyl!  If you’ve never heard this record, you should seriously check it out.

B9R-23 Reaching Forward – “Burning The Lies” CD

B9R-24 Sworn In – “s/t” 7″There was a B9 pressing of this 7″ as well as a European pressing on Reflections Records.  The B9 pressing was 220 on yellow, 425 on clear/black split, 600 on red/black split, and 1200 on black.  The red/black splatter in the bottom right hand corner was a Reflections Records pressing out of 500 copies (there were also 250 white and 250 red on Reflections, but I never owned those).  This band really did mimic almost everything American Nightmare was doing, all the way down to the music, vocal style, lyrics, blood splatter artwork, and overall aesthetic.  In fact, I remember seeing the dude that sang in Sworn In wandering around Positive Numbers Festival 2002 in Wilkes Barre, PA, and I saw multiple people actually mistake him for Wes Eisold from AN, haha.  He had a similar hair cut, clothes, little moccasin shoes, everything.  Anyway, I still thought this 7″ was actually pretty fucking awesome, and it’s too bad they didn’t do anything more after this.  As bands mature they always develop their own thing, and I think this could have turned into something cool.

The layout for this 7″ was a glued pocket cover with an insert.  This photo shows the back cover and insert.  It’s got a real desperate vibe with girl troubles, blood splatter, and suicide, identical to a lot of the same imagery you saw American Nightmare doing around this time.

B9R-25  Kill Your Idols / Good Riddance – “Split” 7″The 1st pressing was 300 pink, 700 white, 1,000 black.  2nd pressing was 1,000 on red.  It seems like Kill Your Idols has more songs than any other hardcore band in existence!  Don’t get me wrong, I’m actually a big fan of KYI, but man it was hard to keep up with all the material they were always releasing.  They may also have set a record for most split EP’s ever – I can think of splits they did with Full Speed Ahead, Voorhees, Nerve Agents, Crime In Stereo, Good Riddance, Fisticuffs, and I’m probably missing something.  On top of that, they had a bunch of their own EP’s and full length records!  I wonder how many total songs they had?  I know it’s well into the hundreds.  This split was cool because I’ve always loved Good Riddance.  Growing up in California, GR was one of the first hardcore punk bands I ever saw.  I saw them right after they released their second album, “A Comprehensive Guide To Moderne Rebellion”.  That has always been an album I held up as a “classic” for me, just because I played it over and over when I was a kid.  That record has held up really well, and I still listen to it pretty often.  In fact, I like pretty much all of the Good Riddance albums, they were a really good band.

The glue pocket cover plus insert.  I always like photos like that with two bands hanging out together.

B9R-26  Champion – “Count Our Numbers” 7″

Champion was a very important band to the West Coast hardcore scene in the 2000’s era, and ultimately, they became an important hardcore band on a truly global level. One of the most special things about Champion is their commitment. As far as I know, the main members of Champion are all still straight edge: Chris Williams, Jim Hesketh, Aram Arslanian, Todd Preboski, Andy Norton, and Timm McIntosh. I don’t keep up on this sort of shit, and they’ll always be my friends no matter what, so I may be wrong about that. But I’m pretty sure of it. This is a pretty unique thing for an outspoken straight edge band to still maintain that commitment years and years later. There’s more to life and this isn’t necessarily the most important thing in the world, but it does give a glimpse into character traits that make all of these guys very good friends to have: loyalty, consciousness, integrity, and commitment. These guys are my dudes, and I love them for it. If you’re a fan of Champion, you may want to read my complete Champion blog entry, which has a ton of cool stories and photos… Here’s the complete set of the “Count Our Numbers” 7″. Test pressings are out of 16 copies, mine is #5/16. The record release cover is a rip-off cover of Youth Of Today “We’re Not In This Alone” with white vinyl, numbered out of 116 – mine is #48/116. In the same way that Timm McIntosh had a thing with the number “43”, and Count Me Out had a thing with “110”, Champion eventually ended up having a thing with “16” because of the song on this record called “One Sixteen”. The rest of the 1st pressing was: blue marble vinyl out of 250, white vinyl out of 384, and black vinyl out of 1250. Later, B9 re-pressed 250 on purple vinyl that had special “Time Slips Away” labels to go along with the new “Time Slips Away” CD that B9 released in 2005 which had both Champion 7″ EP’s on one 13-song CD. Some of the purple copies came out blue. It’s hard to see in the photo above, so see the photo below when holding them up to the light.

This is a note that Chris Williams sent me in March of 2002 with a burned CD copy of the new Champion recording that they had just finished – which ended up being the “Count Our Numbers” 7″ for Bridge 9. Chris always called me “NorKyle” (NorCal, get it?), so that’s the “Nor,” at the beginning, haha. The reference to “DxDx” is The Damage Done, and our upcoming East Coast Tour that we had planned for June 2002. Coincidentally, Champion’s B9 debut “Count Our Numbers” ended up being available for the first time while we were out there on that East Coast Tour in June of 2002. Anyway, when Chris sent me this CD, I was fucking blown away. Their new recording was a huge step up from the “Come Out Swinging” 7″, and I was already a big fan of the first one! I remember listening to this burned CD about 3 times through, and just totally excited about it. I hopped in the car and drove across town in San Luis Obispo to Voegtli and James’s apartment where we all used to hang out. I had to find someone to share it with because I was pumped that my friends had just made this record – I knew big things were ahead for the dudes.

Here’s a photo of me singing for Champion! Haha, well not exactly. You can see Ben on bass, Chris Williams hidden behind him, and Jim walking away after he just threw me the mic. I used to hop up and sing the end of “The Decline” sometimes, starting at “Now only a whisper remains, of the person I once knew….” Notice how empty it seems at Gilman? Well part of the problem was it was a Sunday matinée. But regardless, just like I’ve written many times here and in the Carry On post – my friends and I had to work really hard to build the traditional hardcore scene here in California that we finally started to see really blossom later from 2002-2005.

When making the purple vinyl, they mix blue and red to make purple, so there are a few that came out blue. Blue on left, purple on right. The pressing was 250 copies in total. I got my blue copy from Aram a couple of years ago. He told me it was probably something like 60 or less on blue, the rest on purple.

The test pressing, mine is #5/16.

Close-up of the record release, white vinyl #48/116. Chris saved me one of these, and mailed it down to me after the record release show.

I love, love, love the layout and imagery of this record. It’s like In My Eyes “Nothing To Hide” goes to Seattle, haha. It’s nice and clean, with that metallic blue silver ink. I love when hardcore/punk resembles it’s region, and this layout is perfect for Seattle and the “Emerald City”. It’s kinda cool that Jim’s brother, Danny Hesketh, made the album cover, too. Danny went on to sing in Sinking Ships.

The photo on the back cover of the Seattle skyline is amazing. Seriously great photo!

Promo poster for the release. I told you, I love this layout!

Here’s a quilt of shirts that I paid a women in my neighborhood in 2007 to make for me out of all my hardcore shirts that didn’t fit me anymore. There’s a cool Champion “Count Our Numbers” shirt right at the bottom/middle of the photo. There’s another Champion shirt in the upper right hand – just a black shirt with a silver splotch and Champion cut out in black. I’m a size M or L, so most of the shirts in this quilt were either size Mediums that were really on the small side, old XL shirts that I never could wear anyway, or just shirts I didn’t like wearing but wanted to save for nostalgia. This quilt is awesome – it’s a double-sided queen sized quilt, with 8 shirts down the side and 7 across the top. So, 56 shirts on each side, for a total of 112 t-shirts. Fuck yeah!

B9R-27  Some Kind Of Hate – “s/t” 7″Some Kind Of Hate was Matt Pike’s band.  Pike booked all the big tours around the 2000 hardcore era, and he eventually started The Kenmore Agency and even shared an office with Bridge 9 and Deathwish for a while.  The first pressing was 300 on black with stamped/hand-written labels and big 7″ hole, 700 on orange, and 1,000 on black.  There were also 50 copies that mistakenly got an American Nightmare “The Sun” 7″ label, but on the b-side only!  As usual, Chris Wrenn hooked me up and sent it to me with my pre-order – I was stoked!  Here is what the B9 discography says about this pressing oddity:  “The pressing plant was pressing American Nightmare for us and also had labels for “the Sun Isn’t Getting Any Brighter EP” and accidentally put 50 of these labels on the side B of our first press of Some Kind Of Hate.”  I also had a test pressing of this 7″, out of 20 copies, but I sold it a while back.

Here’s a photo of the test pressing that I sold a while back. I got it from my friend Todd Jones, so you can see it’s personalized to him on the label “This record belongs to Todd Jones #10/20”.

On the left you can get a closer look at the AN label, out of 50 copies.  On the right, my “big hole” copy out of 300 has a hand-written “Boston is mine. It owes me a living”, haha.  I guess in a way, Boston has done just that for Matt Pike, via booking bands through The Kenmore Agency!

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-28  Panic – “s/t” 7″The 2nd Panic 7″.  The 1st pressing was 200 on white, 300 on black, and 1,500 on clear.  Panic made their own cover for one of the Back To School Jam shows, and numbered it out of 35, using some of the clear vinyl, so that leaves 1,465 on clear vinyl with the regular cover.  They painted PANIC on 35 different old 7″ covers, so each Back To School Jam cover is unique!  This is one of the only B9 rarities that I was never able to run down, so it is not pictured here.  Much later there was a 2nd press on pink vinyl out of 200, which I picked up from the B9 table at the last Positive Numbers Festival in 2005.  I also owned a test pressing, out of only 10 copies!  I sold it a while back, but included photos below.

The test pressing cover is numbered, #6/10.  Only 10 copies!  This is one of the more rare B9 test pressings, which were usually out of 15 or 20 copies.

I got my 7″ from the vocalist, Gibby Miller, so the 7″ label is personalized with his name.  It also has the pressing date, June 4th, 2002.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-29  Striking Distance “The Fuse is Lit” 7″Striking Distance was such a fucking cool band, and they never quite got the respect that they deserved. They were around during a period when American Nightmare was pretty much the hardcore band, and I just think that Striking Distance was so much more in the vein of no-bullshit-hardcore-punk that they weren’t quite appreciated in the same way that maybe they would have been if they had existed during a different era. Nonetheless, all of their material seriously rips, and Dave Byrd sounds like the angriest man alive, haha. There was only one pressing, 200 on blue vinyl, 600 with a red/orange “cow pattern”, and 1200 on black.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-30  No Warning – “Ill Blood” LP

I actually did a dedicated No Warning blog entry, complete with 7″ as well. The following is just a cut/paste from there…. All of the No Warning records are sick. Yes, that includes Suffer Survive. That record is a banger! Everyone was just hating on it because well… They’re haters! haha. I still routinely listen to all of the No Warning records, on an absolute regular basis. If you ask me, Ill Blood is quickly becoming a modern classic NYHC style hardcore record, and not only are they not from NYC, they’re not even from the United States! They were young kids from Toronto, Canada, haha! The song writing is fucking perfect for hard nosed hardcore, the production is so thick and heavy, and the lyrics are downright ridiculous at times – but I kinda love that about them. No Warning was always so fucking snotty and seemed like they didn’t give a fuck about anything, haha. I mean, who writes lyrics like “Not looking for acceptance. I don’t need your guidance. Burning bridges behind us. Turning on you!” Hahaha – “Burning bridges behind us, turning on you”. I mean, I know the song is entitled “Leech” and I know what he’s getting at. But I absolutely love that line and it cracks me up every time I hear it… In a hardcore scene that is constantly preaching loyalty and respect, this dude is writing about admittedly burning bridges and turning on people. Haha, that shit is awesome. There were always all sorts of sketchy rumors (and realities) swirling around No Warning that made them kind of infamous. From their sketchy white power band/demo that they made just to be jackasses, to their singer Ben Cook selling out straightedge right around the time of Posi Numbers Fest one year and puking all over everyone while he sang on stage, to their ties to random famous folks in Toronto (Ben Cook’s sister – Rachel Leigh Cook??, Sum 41 dudes??), to their Rock N Roll party vibe with their music video(s) for “Suffer Survive”. Oh, and don’t forget Ben Cook having the hardest voice this side of Scott Vogel and Freddy Madball, despite being a tiny little dude and a teenage movie star in the movie “Little Women”. Ah, all the classic stories, and they only help further cement No Warning’s infamy in this era of hardcore. What you see on the top row is a test pressing of Ill Blood on the left, and a test pressing of Suffer Survive on the right. Yes, that’s right, I said Suffer Survive. Before I go any further I’ll explain. Bridge 9 had the vinyl rights for No Warning’s “major label debut”, but when the record kind of fell flat on its face (by major label standards) and the band broke up, Bridge 9 scrapped the release…. But the test pressings had already been made! So, there are literally 16 copies of the Suffer Survive LP pressed on vinyl in the entire world. This is one of them. Ok, back to Ill Blood. As I said at the very top of this entry, the Ill Blood LP is one of the sweetest hardcore LP’s of the modern hardcore era… Seriously. I listen to it all the time. The first pressing of the LP was supposed to be this cool cross pattern of “blood and shit”, but the pressing plant screwed it up a little bit, and Bridge Nine Records received the first record you see on the second row. They kept only 50 copies, dubbed it the “peanut butter and jelly” version, and sent the rest back to the pressing plant. The plant promptly re-pressed 350 on blood and shit colored vinyl. Personally, I think the PB&J looks cooler! But the blood and shit matches the rats and blood on the cover, so I get it. I got my PB&J and blood and shit copy directly from Bridge 9 by pre-ordering Ill Blood when it came out. Chris Wrenn at Bridge 9 always went way out of his way to hook me up because I’d been pre-ordering records since the early days of the Proclamation 7″, B9 straightedge t-shirts, and B9 skateboards. He sent me the PB&J copy, as well as the rarest version of almost every single other record I ever pre-ordered from him. Chris is a very cool dude – I’ve always appreciated him for that! Anyway, to round out the 1,000 from the first pressing, the black vinyl is out of 600 copies. Even black vinyl goes for quite a bit of money these days because there were really only 1,000 copies of this thing ever pressed. Scratch that, I guess there were 1,141 pressed, because in 2009 Bridge 9 put together a series of covers called the “Bridge 9 Warehouse” editions for some left-over vinyl they found in the warehouse with no covers. The Ill Blood warehouse edition is #/141, with some on blood/shit vinyl and some on black vinyl. I’m not sure the breakdown of each. All I know is my blood/shit is #29/141 and my black vinyl copy is #92/141.

Close-up of the “Ill Blood” test pressing.

This is the “pre-order package”, exactly as it arrived from Bridge Nine in the early 2000’s. There had been a ton of problems with this release (namely, the PB&J vinyl color fiasco), so people waited for months for their pre-orders while things got sorted out. When the pre-orders finally came, there was an “apology note” included, plus a special bonus 7″ for free – the Terror “Live and Death” at the Showcase Theatre 7″! This was the first of the beginning of the “Bridge Nine Bonus Series” of 7″s. There were 500 of these Terror 7″s pressed, but only those 173 copies that came with No Warning pre-orders got a special “Sorry about the No Warning” stamp. It’s interesting that there were only 173 different people who pre-ordered the No Warning LP, despite it being a hugely anticipated record back then. This just goes to show how much hardcore has grown in the last 10 years and our expectation of a “big record” these days is much, much bigger than that. But make no mistake, this was a big, big record back then!

Here’s the note apologizing for the delays and explaining the free Terror 7″!

Stamp on b-side of Terror. 7″: “Sorry the No Warning LP took so long. Here is a gift from the B9 Crew.”

Close-up of the “Peanut Butter & Jelly” error pressing, out of only 50 copies!

Close-up of the corrected “Blood and Shit” color.

Promo poster

B9R-31 Holding On – “Question What You Live For” LPHolding On was another super underrated band! Their previous full length album, “Just Another Day”, was seriously fucking sick! The problem with that album was that the recording was really shitty, but the songs were so dope. It didn’t help that Holding On was from Minnesota, either. If they had been from the east coast, I’ll bet they would have been a really popular band. I thought it was really cool when B9 picked them up, because they really did deserve it. This LP on B9 isn’t quite as good as the “Just Another Day” LP, but it’s still pretty good. This record was also an important release for B9 because it forged a relationship with Chris Wrenn and the Holding On drummer, Karl Hensel. Karl would eventually become Bridge 9’s first official “label manager” when things finally got so big that Chris really needed to hire someone to help run the day-to-day operations at B9. The black vinyl out of 96 was rushed for the record release show. Using the labels on this black vinyl version was un-planned, so that left 90 grey vinyl copies with blank white labels. These got an “H” and “O” stamped on the blank white labels. The regular pressing was 275 on orange vinyl and 500 on grey vinyl. Mysteriously, 42 copies on yellow vinyl showed up?! This is one of the harder B9 rarities to find. I got lucky because Chris Wrenn sent me one of these super limited yellow vinyl copies with my pre-order! The copy in the bottom right hand corner was made for the final Modern Life Is War shows in April 2008, which Holding On played as a “reunion” of sorts. Mine is #44/40…? They must have found some additional vinyl in the B9 warehouse or something, so they made some covers for them? I think I remember seeing that some of these covers have different vinyl with it – orange, yellow, black, or grey vinyl, etc. I don’t know, the B9 discography doesn’t mention this version. I also owned a test pressing, out of only 8 copies! I sold it a while back, but dug out a photo that I used for eBay.

Here’s the test pressing, out of only 8 copies! I sold this a while back.

A close-up of the “H” and “O” stamps that they used on the 90 grey copies with blank stamped labels.

Here’s the back of the final version sold at the last Modern Life Is War shows in April 2008. Mine is #44/40. I don’t know if they made the covers before pulling out the left-over vinyl, and then realized they actually had more than 40 copies? I’m not sure what’s up with it.

The cover and insert.

B9R-32 Slapshot – “Greatest Hits, Slashes, and Crosschecks” CD

B9R-33 Ramallah – “But A Whimper” 2×7″Ramallah was White Trash Rob from Blood For Blood’s side project of sorts. It’s pretty nasty and scathing stuff. This release was a double 7″ set, 500 on gold, 1,000 on orange.

The full layout of the double 7″ gatefold cover.

B9R-34 Terror – “Lowest Of The Low” LPI actually did a dedicated Terror blog entry, this is just an excerpt directly from there… My involvement with Terror was mostly in the early days of the band’s existence. After things with Carry On ended abruptly, I think Todd did the only thing he knew how to do: channel all of that anger and intensity into new songs, and seek out the most fucking hardcore dude he could count on to live and breathe hardcore – that guy was Scott Vogel. It didn’t take long, and Terror was born. I’m pretty sure that my band, The Damage Done played Terror’s first show. To top it off, we played last that night! Holy shit was that intimidating and inappropriate – haha, Terror should have been headlining their own first show. But I mean, they couldn’t really do that. That show was at Pat’s Warehouse in Ventura, CA with Piece By Piece, Terror, Hit The Deck, Diehard Youth, and The Damage Done. I think Terror played 2nd. They played in this tiny ass warehouse space, with dual full stacks on either side, with Scott Vogel hoods-up in a 100 Demons hoodie that had this gnarly ram’s head screen printed on the back of the actual hood, so you could only see it when the hood was up. The whole scene was just super impressive, both musically and visually, and it was fast, heavy, intense, and fucking loud. The rest is history, but man, that shit was a cool way to start a band. Lowest Of The Low is so fucking sick. I still listen to it all the time, especially if I want to go for a quick run. You can bust out a quick 2+ mile run with this record because it’s only like 18-20 minutes long. It’s fast, it’s heavy, it’s hard, but it’s still absolutely straight up hardcore, without any metal bullshit. I love this thing. The pressing info is very simple – 1st pressing, 1,000 copies on yellow vinyl, that’s it. It wasn’t until 2009 that this 2nd pressing on clear vinyl out of 1,000 copies surfaced. When Bridge 9 was doing their “Warehouse edition” covers on a bunch of old left-over vinyl, they said something about “5 years later, we’ve come across a 2nd pressing of 1,000 on clear”, but I don’t think it’s entirely true that those have been sitting around in a warehouse… 1. B9 didn’t start pressing at Rainbo Records until very recently, and 2. the thing with Trustkill basically stealing the “Lowest Of The Low” release was really ugly and I don’t think B9 would have messed around with pressing while all that was going on. My guess is that they probably had 1,000 extra jackets and inserts lying around and worked out a deal with the parties involved to press 1,000 more copies on vinyl. Usually labels will do runs of at least 2,000 pieces of print at a time to save money per print, so that’s why I’m guessing they had print left over. Who knows though, I didn’t ask. The first pressing of this CD came in this cool metal tin, out of 1,000 copies. I would need to dig out the CDs in my garage to find it. I remember the first time the band got these special CD’s in their hands… Terror was doing a short weekend of shows with In Control up the coast to Seattle, and Todd asked me if I wanted to come along – I said fuck yeah. The first show was at 924 Gilman St. in Berkeley, CA. I had moved to the Bay Area in 2002, so I was already living up here. Myself and like 5-6 other friends were renting out this house that came to be known as “the Calaveras house”, and eventually turned into your typical punk house. At some point, my friend Doug Weber and his girlfriend had moved in. Doug eventually got to talking with Scott and Todd, and he ended up joining Terror as their 2nd guitarist (previously, Todd was handling it solo). Shortly thereafter, Doug started spending most of his time in L.A., and wasn’t around the house much anymore. So I just met up with Doug, Todd, Scott, and the guys at the first show at Gilman. I got to the show and started setting up merch right away. They had just gotten these “tin” CDs in the mail from Bridge 9, and this was the first time they had them at a show. It was also the first Terror material available on CD, other than their own self-released Demo. The problem was, the CDs had just been finished, so only 100 were rushed overnight from the east coast to California (that shit is expensive). Honestly, normally that really would be enough for just 3 shows. But I put those things out on the table, and holy shit, it was like a maelstrom. It felt like no matter what I did, I couldn’t work through that line of kids. I sold through the first 100 CD’s in seriously like 20 minutes, but the line didn’t stop – they still kept coming, just wanting to buy shirts or demos or whatever they could get. It seriously did not stop for the entire show, it was kind of bizarre. Shit just wasn’t usually like that for any band, especially not for CD’s and t-shirts. Yeah, kids went wild for vinyl sometimes, but it’s not like we had a limited record release vinyl or anything. Terror was just huge, and it had happened overnight, off a fucking demo! That Gilman show was fucking sick, kids went off. We packed up and started the over-night drive to Seattle. The only talk in the van for the first 30 minutes was seriously how wild and fun the show had been, and how bummed they were that they didn’t bring more stuff – we had zero CD’s and very little merch left for the other 2 shows. The Seattle show went pretty good, and everyone had a good time. I remember something funny and embarrassing happened to me after the show… I was opening up the back door of the van to start loading out, and the fucking key broke off in the door! Hahaha, of course when the guys started filing outside with equipment I had to “explain myself”. But shit, I hadn’t been doing anything weird, the fucking key just snapped in half when I put it in and turned! hahaha. Luckily everyone was pretty cool about it, but I felt like a fool. I could tell they were a bit annoyed because it made us stuck there at the venue for another 1-2 hours, but no one really said anything about it… We just called a lock smith and they came and were able to make another key. No one asked me to pay for it or anything, so that was cool of them. Hahaha, I felt like such a tool.

Like the first Terror 7″, I know this test pressing was kept to a very small amount. Todd was always super adamant that test pressings be kept to an absolute minimum on releases he was involved in. Bridge 9’s discography page confirms that there are only 4 copies of this 1st press test pressing made at United Record pressing. There are 20 copies of the test pressing from Rainbo Records, used to make the 1,000 2nd press clear vinyl copies.

Promo poster for the release on Bridge Nine.

Reflections Records handled the European release of “Lowest Of The Low”, but it was a 10″, not a 12″. There are 500 copies of each color scheme.

B9R-35 American Nightmare – “Year One” 2×7″

The “Year One” double 7″ set features the first two American Nightmare 7″s, as the artwork depicts. This 7″ came out after the band had to change their name, so you see “Give Up The Ghost” on the labels. The set on the top was 500 on orange and clear vinyl, the blue and black set was out of 1,000

Here’s the inside and outside of the “Year One” double 7″ layout. It’s printed on matte non-glossy stock, so the printing looks kinda washed out. Kind of a bummer – the euro gatefold LP version shown below looks a lot better.

This one was pressed in Europe by Reflections Records, and kind of accompanied Bridge 9’s release of the “Year One” Double 7″. I think the pressing info is /250, /250, and /500, so there were only 1,000 total. It actually has this really cool gatefold layout, which is really nice. The only bummer is the vinyl colors – so ugly! Layout gets a thumbs up, but vinyl colors not so much.

Here is a promo poster for the “Year One” LP on Reflections Records.

B9R-36 Champion – “Come Out Swinging” 7″Mike Phyte from Phyte Records released Champion’s first record. I believe Chris Williams from Champion had filled in on guitar for Good Clean Fun for a bit, so he had become friends with Mike? I may be remembering that wrong. Anyway, Phyte was only going to do a CD release, so a European label stepped up and was willing to do the vinyl – Platinum Recordings in Germany. Shown here is a test pressing out of 12 copies, mine is #12/12. The colored vinyl version of this release was clear vinyl with white mixed in, out of 300 in total. They did a tour edition with some of these, with a Side By Side rip-off cover, mine is #42/143. So that would leave 157 on clear/white swirl with regular covers. There were 900 pressed on black vinyl. It was during this time that I became closer with everyone in Champion, not just Chris. In early 2001, I rode up to Seattle with Carry On for a show in Seattle with Champion. They had planned a weekend of shows together in Seattle, the Bay Area, CA, and Ojai, CA. The first show in Seattle was awesome, and it was the beginnings of forging a friendship between the two bands – Carry On and Champion.

Here’s a photo of Champion playing that night in Seattle. Chris Williams doing a crowd buster while playing guitar, me in a bright red shirt just sitting on people’s heads after doing a flip off the stage. That night I decided to switch with Aram and ride down to California in the Champion van, while Aram rode down with Carry On. With Lucas joining the Carry On van (he played drums in Carry On, but had been home in Vancouver, BC for a little bit after Christmas), it was crowded, and I was excited to hang out with my friends from Champion. I had been friends with Chris for a while, but hanging out in Seattle and the trip back down to California was also the beginning of my friendship with Aram Arslanian, Jim Hesketh, Todd Preboski, and Timm McIntosh. I remember Aram wanting to ride down with Carry On that night because he’d spent some time with Todd Jones that day, and Aram kept talking about what a trip Todd was, how frustrated and angry he was, hahaha. He wanted to get to know him a little better, and see what was up. Overall, I think he was kind of intrigued by Todd, haha. I think that was probably the real beginning of Todd and Aram’s friendship too, which has lasted for over 10 years and culminated with their band together – Betrayed. Ultimately, the union with Carry On probably helped quite a bit in getting Champion on the radar of Bridge Nine Records. Carry On had recently recorded and released “A Life Less Plagued” on B9, and I know the Carry On / Champion relationship probably had quite a bit to do with B9 asking Champion to be part of the team too. That was a smart move by Bridge 9, because Champion ended up being Bridge 9’s first really big global band. Champion totally deserved it – they were an awesome band, they were super hard workers, and they were so supportive of all the other bands – not just as a band, but each individual member went out of his way to be supportive of all the other kids on the west coast. Champion had the foundation all put together, they really just needed someone to push them on an (inter)national level, and B9 made that happen for them.

Close-up of the test pressing on Platinum Recordings. Mine is #12/12 on the back. I got mine from Danny at Platinum Recordings in some trade in 2002 or so.

My tour copy is #42/143. Timm McIntosh, the guys in Trial, and other dudes in Seattle had this thing about the number “43”. It’s kinda like Count Me Out and their thing with “110”. So everything Timm did was always out of 43 or 143, etc.

Here is a note from Chris Williams to me in the Summer of 2001. Chris always called me “NorKyle” (NorCal, get it?), so that’s the “Nor,” at the beginning. But, he said that he needed more positive hardcore kids in Seattle, and was always hellbent on me moving up there, thus the crossed out “Nor” replaced with “Sea”. There’s also a pretty sketchy double entendre going on here. When Carry On had been up in Seattle in Spring of 2001, Graham Clise (bass in Carry On for a minute, later guitarist of Annihilation Time) had thought of this brilliant nickname for me – “sieg Kyle”(yes, as in nazi “sieg heil”) I know, so sketch. So that became an inside joke for a long time, and Chris Williams always thought it was hilarious to whisper that every once in a while at shows. His little double-entendre here with “sieg and Sea” is pretty clever, haha. Anyway, the reason for this note: at the shows on the 2001 Summer tour where they sold the Side By Side rip-off covers, he told me that he had saved me a copy, but he had forgotten it at home. So I didn’t buy one at the shows on tour, and Chris eventually mailed me mine once he got home after the tour. When he mentions the Gilman show, he’s mentioning the Carry On / Champion show at 924 Gilman St in Summer of 2001. The pictures that I posted in the Carry On write-up with Jim, Chris, and myself singing along to Carry On are from this Gilman show. When he references “this winter”, he’s referring to the West Coast Tour with The First Step and Stay Gold that he was planning for December 2001. Little did either of us know that by then, I would have a band (The Damage Done) and we would be playing a bunch of those shows too!

Here’s the original layout and insert for the release on Platinum Recordings. I remember being over at Timm McIntosh’s house when he was working on this slick Flash website that he was building for xchampionx.org (I think that was their website back then). I was up in Seattle in April 2001 because I’d driven Lucas McFadden and Kelsey Yates home to Vancouver, BC while I was on spring break from college. Kelsey had come to visit me for a week in San Luis Obispo, and Lucas was playing drums in Carry On, living in L.A. So I thought that would be a fun trip for spring break, and would save both of them a bus ticket and long-ass 25+ hour ride home. Anyway – Timm was working on the website, using this layout as a general theme. This was before I’d seen a hardcore band with this level of a website – most people weren’t doing a lot of stuff in Flash yet, and it looked really sweet. Every click had animation and all of these scenes from a boxing video, etc. He was showing it to me because I was going to school for Computer Science, so I was mostly into more back-end shit, but we were kind of comparing notes on front-end vs. back-end web programming.

Check this out! After I posted this blog entry, Danny from Platinum Recordings contacted me and notified me of a clear/black swirl variation with blank labels, out of less than 20 copies! He said that he sent these out in random mail order when it first came out. I had never even seen nor heard of this variation before. He offered to trade me a copy for a regular clear/white swirl copy since he didn’t have a regular one anymore. That was really nice of him! Thanks Danny! A week or two later, it arrived. Here it is, another crazy rare Champion record, out of less than 20 copies.

The clear/black swirl copy from another angle.

Yet another angle.

Early in 2003, Bridge Nine re-released “Come Out Swinging” on CD and vinyl. I think Phyte Records had basically stopped doing releases, so to keep the release in print, they re-released it on B9. There was a rejected test pressing out of only 3 copies and an accepted test pressing out of 8. The Positive Numbers Festival 2003 is an edition on green vinyl, blank stamped labels, and “eagle” cover #/116 (duh). Mine is #69/116. The regular 1st pressing was 300 on green and 700 on clear. The greens vary, so I’ve got a “mint green” copy and a nice darker green copy. Aram sent me the “mint green” copy a couple of years ago. But either way, they are all solid/marble green. The orange vinyl is out of 250 with special “Time Slips Away” labels and was pressed at the same time as the purple vinyl “Count Our Numbers”. These were made to go along with the release of the “Time Slips Away” CD in 2005 that compiled both EP’s onto one 13 song CD. I bought this orange vinyl copy at Posi Numbers Fest 2005. You may be wondering about the transparent green copy with completely blank labels on the top row? Yeah, we think there are only 3 copies in existence. See below for more info.

No one even knew these transparent green copies existed until they popped up on someone’s trade list. Through some detective work, it was discovered that someone who was working at Bridge Nine during the time when these were pressed found these transparent green copies when the pressing first came in, and stole them from the B9 offices before anyone ever noticed they existed. Before long he sold/traded them, so we’ve pretty much figured out that there’s only 3 of them out there. I suppose there could be more, but they’re kind of valuable, so they would have popped up by now. I got my clear green copy from Scott Pesek when he was selling a bunch of his records. He had gotten it directly from the dude who had taken them from B9. There are also a few solid green copies out there that have blank labels, but we think those are just extra copies above and beyond the 116 of the Posi Press, so they did not get stamps. Those are kind of a different deal than these transparent clear green ones that got stolen.

Comparing Rejected test press (out of 3) to Accepted test press (out of 8). I imagine it was rejected due to some audio issues, but the matrix etching was also screwed up on that first rejected pressing. The rejected matrix says “Matt Pike – Modern Day Archie”. The accepted matrix says “Matt Pike – Modern Day Archie BUNKER”, where the BUNKER is hand-written differently. The Rejected test press also has the “eagle” artwork on the cover that was used for the Posi Numbers version. The only difference is the banner on the eagle art says “TEST-PRESS” instead of “POSI-FEST”.

Close-up of my Accepted test pressing labels, with pressing date and catalog number. My Rejected test pressing does not have anything written on the labels.

This is the Positive Numbers Festival 2003 version, with alternate “eagle” cover. Mine is #69/116 on the back.

Close-up of the stamped labels. A few people out there have some copies that didn’t get the stamp, so the labels are blank.

Orange vinyl with “Time Slips Away” labels, out of 250.

It’s cool how they had the layout done in such a way that it matches the look and feel of the “Count Our Numbers” 7″, almost making them seem like a double 7″ type thing. That made it even more appropriate when they released the “Time Slips Away” CD with both EP’s combined into one 13 song CD, almost as if it was a full length.

Just showing the original Platinum Recordings and the re-released Bridge Nine version of “Come Out Swinging” 7″ together in one photo.

Here’s a cassette version of “Time Slips Away” that was released by Refuse Records in Poland.

Here’s a cool video of Champion playing at 924 Gilman St. at The Damage Done’s last show on October 4th, 2003. The very first thing Jim says on this video is “I want to thank For The Crown and The Damage Done”. Both of our bands had been significant reasons why the Bay Area hardcore scene had grown so much in the past couple of years. At 11:15 Jim mentions the first release on my brand new label, Rivalry Records. At 22:20 you see Eightclip do a stage dive, and promptly start screaming “I know, I know, no stage dives. I thought this was the Pound. Sorry! Sorry!”, haha. He was just dicking around, but yeah, Gilman doesn’t allow stage diving due to their insurance/liability issues. At 22:40, Todd Jones comes up to sing a cover of Alone In A Crowd’s “Is Anybody There?”. He starts talking about recognizing people from two years ago at Champion / Carry On shows and is stoked how things have evolved and straight-up hardcore is so alive in California. Refer to my Carry On blog post to understand why this is relevant and important… I feel like the Champion and Carry On write-ups go hand in hand, and one isn’t quite as relevant without the other. Then he mentions how cool he thinks it is that kids in the Bay Area actually fucking get along and work together. Like I was saying before – the Bay Area from 2002-2005 was a very special place because we had all gone out of our way to be inclusive instead of using musical taste or sociopolitical views to be divisive. On a lighter note – A funny thing happens after he gets done saying that… At 23:10, you hear Eightclip say “He’s nervous!” because Aram keeps tuning and they haven’t started the song. Todd turns around smiling and says in his patented Todd Jones cocky attitude, “I’m not fucking nervous, I don’t know the meaning of that word.” I mean, it’s TJ, so he is serious, but he was just fucking around because he knew it was Eightclip that was giving him a hard time. Hahaha, I love that part, because that is classic TJ persona. At 25:15, before the last song, Jim mentions “all our friends, and all the kids that have been around for the last 3 years, that have built this up from the ground.” That’s a lot of what was talked about in that Carry On write-up. We’d all been banging our heads against the wall since 1999/2000, doing bands, doing labels, doing zines, booking shows, all while sometimes feeling like others were spitting in our faces. It felt like all the hard work had finally paid off, and everyone was getting along – metallic hardcore, straight-up positive hardcore, political hardcore – everybody.

B9R-37 On The Rise – “Burning Inside” CD

B9R-38 American Nightmare – “Love American” 7″

The “Love American” picture disc was a single that came out sometime between the band’s two LP’s on Equal Vision Records. There are only 1,000 copies and they are all picture discs. The only exception is the test pressing on black vinyl out of 10 copies. There are no markings on it, other than the AN angel stamped on the dust sleeve. This is a particularly cool test pressing to own since it is the only non-picture disc version of this 7″ ever pressed, out of 10 copies! I bought this direct from Bridge 9 during one of their eBay auctions.

Close-up of the AN Angel stamp on the “Love American” test pressing, out of only 10 copies.

B9R-39 Stand & Fight – “Impact Demo” 7″Stand & Fight was originally a band called “Impact” started by Wrench of Ten Yard Fight and Greg Bacon of Carry On. Impact released a Demo sometime around 2002, but quickly changed their name to Stand & Fight. When Bridge 9 was planning to release the first Stand & Fight EP, they released the Impact demo on vinyl. There are 300 on blue vinyl and 700 on red vinyl.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-40 Mental – “Get An Oxygen Tank!” 7″

Mental kind of took over carrying the torch for Boston straightedge once Ten Yard Fight and In My Eyes broke up in 1999 and 2000. Greg, the vocalist of Mental, started Lockin Out Records and represented a whole new era of Boston straightedge hardcore. Mental and Lockin Out led a whole slew of bands that started out on sort of a goofy, bouncy, Underdog vibe, and ended up on a more “serious” Supertouch vibe. The torch eventually got handed off to Have Heart as far as the Boston straightedge goes. I’ve always thought it was kind of neat how Boston always tends to hand things off in this manner. Obviously never explicitly done, but it seems like that scene in particular always has fairly defined “hand offs” that seem to happen. I love the locality in punk and the way it defines the look, sound, and feel of scenes across the country, and this is something I’ve always felt that was unique to Boston. Greg released most of the Mental material on Lockin Out, but the 2nd Mental 7″, “Get An Oxygen Tank”, came out on Bridge 9 Records. The green vinyl copies were sold at the record release show on August 23, 2003. They had hand stamped labels and a cool “Mental Crew” cover. There was also a pre-pressing with hand stamped labels sold at Posi Numbers Fest in the summer of 2003 – mine is #95/250. The first pressing was 300 on clear purple vinyl and 700 on yellow. The 2nd press was 500 on solid purple marble vinyl. The only thing missing is a “clear blue” copy, which is really just a variant of the 1st press clear purple, so I’m not really concerned about that. It seemed like it was quite awhile before another Mental record came out… I’m not totally sure what happened between Mental and Bridge 9, but I know there was some rift that happened there. Eventually, Greg went back to releasing Mental records himself on Lockin Out, and the “YO!” 7″ materialized… The Mental blog entry has more photos of all the other Mental records, including a Rasta Cover of “And You Know This”, etc.

The back cover of the “Mental Crew” copy, showing the record release date of 8/23/03. Only 100 copies on green vinyl.

Here’s a cool promo poster for the Mental, Righteous Jams, Desperate Measures, Lights Out tour in the Summer of 2004.

B9R-41 F-Minus “Sweating Blood” 7″F-Minus was a cool punk band from California. It was kind of weird/surprising when they did this 7″ on B9, but it was cool that they were on B9’s radar! There are 115 on black with blank pink labels sold at a Posi Numbers Fest, 300 on maroon, and 550 on clear with red splotch. The maroon copy on the bottom left looks black but it’s definitely a dark maroon color.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-42 Stand & Fight – “s/t” 7″250 on black vinyl with stamped labels for Posi Numbers Fest 2003, 300 on green vinyl, 700 on white.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-43 Sick Of It All – “Relentless” 7″This SOIA 7″ was the first time B9 had worked with one of the big classic “older” hardcore bands. I remember Chris Wrenn posting on messageboards and the B9 site about this release, just sounding so stoked on being able to work with one of the bands that was a huge part of his formative hardcore years as a kid. There were 115 copies on black vinyl with pink labels sold at a Positive Numbers Festival, 300 on white vinyl, and 550 on maroon/white vinyl. This release was obviously put out at the same time as the F-Minus 7″, and it has the same look and feel with the layout, vinyl colors, etc. This came out during a summer when B9 was planning to release a bunch of singles for bands that weren’t currently “on” B9, including SOIA, F-Minus, and the American Nightmare “Love American” single (they were on Equal Vision Records at this point). I think it was a concerted effort to “diversify” the label and take it to a new level.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-44 Slapshot – “Digital Warfare” LPB9 released Slapshot’s first LP in over 7 years. I’m sure this was another release Chris Wrenn was super pumped on, with Slapshot being a classic Boston staple for nearly 20 years. There are 300 on black vinyl, 700 on yellow.

Some Kind Of Hate – “Undisputed” LPThere was a pre-pressing out of 200 copies on black vinyl with stamped-labels and spray-painted cover. These were sold on their California Tour in 2003 with Champion. I bought mine at a show at “The Pound” in San Francisco, CA. The regular pressing was 300 on purple vinyl and 700 on black. I also owned a copy of both the rejected and accepted test pressings, but I sold them a while back. I dug up the eBay photos and added them below.

The rejected test pressing, out of 10.

The accepted test pressing, out of 10 copies. The cover obviously has a bunch of water damage, but the vinyl was perfectly fine. This copy was personalized to my friend Todd Jones, which is where I got this record. He was always good friends with Matt Pike, so he had a bunch of SKOH stuff.

Here’s the B9 update that came with the Some Kind Of Hate and Slapshot pre-orders. It talks about them building up their new screenprinting shop so they can print everything in-house. This eventually grew into “Liberated Images”, a screen-printing operation owned/run by Kevin from The Hope Conspiracy and Chris Wrenn.

The cover and insert.

B9R-46 Anger Regiment – “Aces And Eights” 7″Anger Regiment was Mark Porter from Floorpunch’s new band, but they never really did much other than release this 7″. This recording doesn’t compare to anything Floorpunch ever did, and ultimately it was just a drop in the bucket type of release. The title of this record, “Aces And Eights”, is obviously a reference to Blackjack strategy “always double down on aces and eights”. The Floorpunch dudes were notorious for their song “Let It Ride” on the “Fast Times” LP – “Goin to A.C., Saturday night, 50 on red, better be right!” This was more of the same. The most limited version of this 7″ was on green vinyl with one hundred dollar bill labels, haha. I thought that was pretty cool. The rest of the pressing was 300 on black vinyl, 700 on red.

A close-up of the one hundred dollar bill labels, out of 100.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-47 The Distance – “Your Closest Enemies” 7″I remember my friend Todd Jones telling me that a dude from The Distance came up to him and introduced himself as “hey, I’m XXXXX, I’m in a band that rips off Carry On”, haha. That’s pretty much what The Distance started out doing, trying to emulate Carry On. They even put out their first 7″ with Scott Magrath on Takeover Records, who was a dude that was part of our whole Carry On crew here in California (plus, Scott was originally from Connecticut, so he knew these dudes anyway, etc). Then they released “Your Closest Enemies” on B9, and after that they somehow morphed into a pop punk band. Weird. There are 150 on red, 350 on clear, and 550 on white.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-48 Outbreak – “You Make Us Sick” 7″Outbreak was a wild band infamous for their wild live shows, with their vocalist Ryan always hurting himself. The guitarist and drummer (Chris and Nate) later went on to form a totally sweet band called Cruel Hand, with Chris singing and Nate on guitar. Nate is a drummer extraordinaire, who has filled in for just about every hardcore band during this era, including Have Heart, Bane, Internal Affairs, etc. The original pressing was 340 on yellow/green swirl, 770 on yellow/black swirl, and 1,100 on maroon vinyl. Years later in 2009, B9 did a “Spring Cleaning” and found a bunch of extra vinyl overrages that didn’t have covers. So they made the “Warehouse edition” for several releases, by having a bunch of covers printed up, but screen-printing the different band names on the covers to differentiate each release. My Outbreak “Warehouse edition” is #12/143. I actually owned a test pressing of this release as well, out of 15 copies, but I sold it a while back.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

There was also a 12″ version of this EP, licensed from B9 and released by Burial Records in the UK. It was a one-time pressing of 500 copies on red vinyl.

B9R-49 Project X – “Straight Edge Revenge” 7″Bridge 9 released all of the Schism fanzine issues together in one hard-bound book. Along with the book’s release, they re-released the infamous Project X 7″ – the first official release of this 7″ since the original on Schism Records, out of only 500 copies. The pre-order package came with the book, a shirt, and a hand-numbered copy on white vinyl, out of 500 copies. Mine is #104/500. There were an additional 1,500 copies on black vinyl with the 1st pressing. The 2nd pressing was another 1,000 copies on black vinyl, but the labels have “B9R-49-2” to differentiate the 1st vs. 2nd press black vinyl copies. The 3rd pressing was 1,000 copies on clear vinyl. I also owned a test pressing of this release, but I sold it a while back.

Here’s the PX 7″ test on B9. It was originally Daniel Halfter’s copy that he had been given by Chris Wrenn for his contributions to the Schism book. I bought it from Daniel, owned it for a couple years, and then sold it sometime in 2010.

Here’s the other side of the dust sleeve that came with the test pressing, featuring a Schism stamp.

Close-up of the different labels on the white vinyl, which are numbered. Mine is #104/500.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-50 ????: I remember posts by Chris Wrenn making a big deal about a special upcoming project for Bridge Nine #50. I imagine it was going to be a cool boxset of early releases, or rare b-side recordings, or something of that nature to commemorate the first 50 releases. Unfortunately, nothing like that ever materialized, and it’s been so long now, that I doubt if the B9R #50 catalog number will ever be filled.

B9R-51 Various Artists “Singles Volume 1” CD

B9R-52 Stand & Fight – “Together We Win” LPThe vinyl colors of this release match the layout perfectly, it looks really good. 330 on purple, 770 on blue/grey swirl. I also owned a test pressing out of 15 copies, but I already sold it. Photo below.

Test pressing, out of 15.

Here’s the B9 update that came with the Stand & Fight pre-order. It talks about the Champion “Time Slips Away” CD order, which came with two bonus 7″s – the Champion “Live In Australia” 7″ and the Miles Away 7″. The photo is actually of Blue Monday, who would be releasing an LP soon on B9.

B9R-53 For The Worse – “The Chaos Continues” 7″300 on blue vinyl and 700 on yellow. There were also 100 copies on black with a limited cover. This is one of the only Bridge 9 rarities that I was never able to find.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-54 For The Worse – “Blood, Guts, Going Nuts” CD

B9R-55 Champion – “Time Slips Away” CD

B9R-56 Champion – “Promises Kept” LPChampion released their “Promises Kept” LP in September of 2004, and basically toured for 2 years straight on that album. They toured the world, from Europe to Australia to Japan/Korea (I think). Champion always looked out for the little guy, even when they themselves were the “little guy” on tours with Sick Of It All, etc. They took Allegiance on tour with Terror, they always championed the new up and coming bands like Outbreak, and Chris Williams was always bringing me back stuff from their travels, showing me what was up with international hardcore in Japan or Australia, etc. The first mix of this album ended up not being totally to the band’s liking, so they went ahead and released the first mix at their record release on September 4th, 2004. The record release was white vinyl out of 150. There is a rejected test pressing that goes with that mix – it has blank white labels, with a REJECTED stamp, out of 10 copies. Then they re-mixed it and pressed the rest of the vinyl. The real first pressing is all along the 2nd row of the photo. It had another test pressing, this time with yellow Erika Records labels, out of 10 copies. The rest of the 1st pressing was 220 on blue for their first tour on the new record, 300 on maroon, and 700 on grey. The 2nd pressing was 500 on black. The final pressing was 400 on this ugly yellow/black/white mix vinyl. There was also a European pressing on Dead & Gone Records from the UK, which is shown on the 3rd row. The test pressing is out of 10 copies, mine is #3/10. The grey vinyl with blank labels was a tour pressing out of 100. The rest is 200 grey with regular labels, 200 on white, and 500 on black. In the bottom row, you can see the “Warehouse edition” that Bridge Nine made in 2009. They had some left over vinyl in the warehouse, so they made these covers for the vinyl. I have one Warehouse Edition on white vinyl from the very first rejected mix pressing (which they used for the record release), which is #10/12 – only 12 copies on white. Then I have another one that is the “last show press” yellow mix vinyl, this one is #177/205. Out of these 205 Warehouse Editions, some were 2nd press black vinyl, some were the final press yellow vinyl. I’m not sure how many of each.

This is a full set of the rejected 1st mix (the only thing missing is my Warehouse Edition white vinyl #10/12). Test pressing at the top right out of 10 copies, and 2 copies of the white vinyl. I couldn’t make the record release show, so either Aram or Chris saved me a copy and mailed me down one of these.

Close-up of the REJECTED test pressing labels, out of 10 copies.

So why do I have 2 on white vinyl? Well, because there is a slight difference with the screen-printing on the back. Here is what the B9 discography says about it: Limited to 150 on white vinyl with screen printed alternate covers. 51 have the Bridge Nine logo on the back. 99 have NO Bridge Nine logo on the back. When they were screen printing the backs of the covers, the ink gummed up around the B9 logo so they proceeded w/ the rest without it. This pressing was made from the rejected tests featuring the first mix of the album.

Close-up showing the difference. The top copy has the B9 logo at the bottom, out of 51, the bottom copy does not, out of 99.

The insert for the record release copies explains the 1st mix rejection situation. Did no one notice that the first character “I” got cut off the very first word of the text: “In February 2004”? They’re all like this too. Weird.

Comparing Rejected test on the left to Accepted test on the right. Both are out of 10 copies only. I got my Accepted test from Aram in a trade for a Go It Alone “The Only Blood Between Us” test pressing. I bought the rejected test pressing off Aram a couple of years ago when he was selling a lot of his records.

Close-up of the Erika labels on the Accepted test pressing, out of 10 copies.

The blue vinyl tour copies out of 220 have the same stamped labels as the record release copies, but using blue ink instead. And obviously this is the accepted mix, whereas the record release is the rejected mix. Jim Hesketh gave me this blue copy when he came down to a show in 2004/2005 that I was throwing at the Danville Grange Hall in Danville, CA. His brother’s band, Sinking Ships, had come down to play it.

This photo just compares the label art across the pressings. Top left is the rejected 1st mix. Top right is the 1st pressing tour pressing, but used the same stamp as the rejected mix. Bottom left is the B9 pressing. Bottom right is the UK pressing on Dead & Gone.

This compares the inserts across the pressings. The top left is the insert used in the rejected record release pressings (the flip-side of that insert is the explanation message that was shown earlier). The top right is the insert used in the B9 release. I think it’s kind of a bummer that the insert is so small. It seems like it should have been more like the one on the bottom, which is the insert for the UK pressing on Dead & Gone Records. I remember Scott Magrath (who did the Promises Kept layout) telling me that he designed the insert to be larger. But I think it got changed up by someone at B9 before it actually got printed.

The test pressing on Dead & Gone comes with a little one-sheet piece of paper as a cover. Mine is #3/10.

Close-up of the Warehouse Edition with the white vinyl rejected pressing, #10/12.

The cassette version of “Promises Kept” was released by Refuse Records in Poland.

B9R-57 The Distance / Some Kind Of Hate / Outbreak – “3 Way Split” 7″The 1st pressing was 300 on solid yellow vinyl and 700 clear vinyl. There was also a tour pressing on gold vinyl out of 300 copies, with blank stamped labels for a California Tour. The 2nd pressing was 400 on green vinyl.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-58 Wrecking Crew – “1987-1991” CD

B9R-59 Terror – “One With The Underdogs” LPTodd Jones was still writing and recording songs for Terror on “One With The Underdogs”. I remember him sending me a photo of him hanging out with Freddy Madball during the recording session while Freddy was doing some guest vocals, haha. But he had stopped traveling and touring with Terror a while before. Touring just wasn’t for him at this point. After this record, he didn’t write anything more for Terror. The pressing info for this record was 150 on gold, 150 on white, 700 on green. Either the gold or the white was only available directly from the band, I don’t remember which.

The test pressing in the upper right hand corner has Erika Records labels, more than likely out of 20 copies. The B9 discography says the following: “The actual quantities of this are not known. The initial job was sent through Erika Records, but they took way too long so the job was terminated. The job was then sent through United Records. It is believed that Erika’s Test Pressing was 20 and United was 10, but we’re not certain of that.”

The back cover, plus insert. I never knew what was up with the cover/artwork of this record… It’s kind of ugly, and I don’t totally get what the imagery has to do with being “one with the underdogs”. The bondage/gag thing is creepy, haha.

B9R-60 Various Artists – “21 Band Hardcore Comp” CD

B9R-60 No Warning – “Suffer Survive” LPYes, that’s right, I said Suffer Survive. This record is a banger! Everyone was just hating on it because well… They’re haters! haha. Bridge 9 had the vinyl rights for No Warning’s “major label debut”, but when the record kind of fell flat on its face (by major label standards) and the band broke up, Bridge 9 scrapped the release…. But the test pressings had already been made! So, there are literally 16 copies of the Suffer Survive LP pressed on vinyl in the entire world. This is one of them. The catalog number B9R-060 appears in the matrix. You’ll notice that the catalog number B9R #60 was also used above for the 21 band hardcore compilation CD. I guess they decided to re-use #60 once “Suffer Survive” was scrapped as a real release.

B9R-61 Death Before Dishonor – “Friends, Family, Forever” LP300 on gold/black vinyl split, 700 on gold/black vinyl splatter.

B9R-62 RnR / Fit For Abuse – “Split” 7″One pressing only – 300 on clear vinyl, 700 on white vinyl, and 1,000 on red vinyl. I also have this cool test pressing on red vinyl, out of only 4 copies! According to the B9 discography, there were 15 test pressings on black, plus 4 tests on red vinyl that mysteriously came along with them.

Close-up of the mysterious red vinyl test pressing, out of only 4 copies!

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-63 Blue Monday – “Rewritten” LPThe Blue Monday LP was a cool record that successfully mixed elements of youth crew, NYHC, and melodic style hardcore into one. If someone told me I should check out a band that sounded like that, I’d laugh and say that sounds awful. “Too much fusion” is the quote that I always throw around when I hear music like that, haha. But in Blue Monday’s case, it totally worked on the “Rewritten” LP. On top of that, the dudes in Blue Monday have always been friends of mine, being part of the greater group of friends that has made up Go It Alone, Blue Monday, Champion, Allegiance, Carry On, and the rest of 2000 era West Coast Hardcore. The 1st pressing was 250 on green vinyl and 650 on purple. There was a record release cover out of 50 copies. Most of the record release copies were on purple vinyl (like the one in the photo), but I actually also owned a copy on green vinyl a while back. So I’m not sure how many they used of each color with the record release cover. There were 50 Sink With Cali covers, 30 of which had purple vinyl, 20 had green vinyl. I sold my Sink With Cali copy a while back, so it didn’t make the photo. The 2nd pressing was a picture disc, out of 500 copies. 50 copies got a Rivalry Showcase 2006 cover, so there are 450 regular picture discs. I also owned a 1st pressing test pressing, out of 20 copies, but I already sold it before taking this photo.

Here’s the test pressing, out of 20 copies.

Here’s the record release cover from the show on September 10th, 2005, out of only 50 copies. The show was also a celebration of Blue Monday vocalist Dave Mac’s 10 Year straightedge anniversary. It was held at Seylynn Hall, which is this cool venue in North Vancouver that the Go It Alone and Blue Monday circle of friends (Matt Smith!) have been throwing shows since the mid to late 90’s. It’s a really cool hall for shows. Check out the bands playing the show – sick lineup, all of my homies!

Here’s the back of the Record Release cover. This one is #27/50.

I also owned a Record Release copy with green vinyl. I think most of them were purple vinyl, but a few record release covers got thrown on green vinyl copies. I got this from a band member, so that’s probably why.

Here’s the Sink With Cali Cover, out of 50 copies. This one is #5/50.

30 of the Sink With Cali covers had purple vinyl, 20 had green vinyl. This one has purple vinyl.

Close-up of the Rivalry Showcase 2006 cover, out of 50 copies.

Here’s the B9 update that came with the Blue Monday pre-order. It announces the signing of Have Heart, and the release of the Schism Records book and Project X 7″ on B9.

Here’s the layout, with a tribute to their friend, Brandie Bailey, who passed away in the years preceding their album release.

Betrayed – “Addiction” 7″I actually did an individual Betrayed blog entry which includes all of their releases. The following is just an excerpt from that entry… One day I was talking with Todd Jones online while I was at work, and he sent me over some mp3s of some melodic riffs that he was working on for a new project. I was super into these things, and I encouraged him to really keep going with this stuff. We both worked 9 to 5 office job type deals, and there was this period where we’d talk throughout the day and he’d often send me little riffs and things he’d been working on. But a lot of times they would get scrapped later, etc. But I’m glad that this stuff stuck around, because eventually he talked with Aram about doing the project together, and a lot of those riffs became the Betrayed “Addiction” EP. I really like the “Addiction” EP most out of everything they’ve done so far. It always reminded me of if you took the experiences of a “Dischord Revolution Summer era” kid, but had him grow up in the 90’s/2000’s era of hardcore, and sped it up a little bit, haha. That probably didn’t make any sense, but it does to me. Anyway, I really like this record, and I was happy to see them keep forging forward with the project, ultimately making it more of a band that actually played shows and everything. The pressing info for the 1st pressing was 90 record release copies with stamped labels, 100 on clear, 250 on red, 250 on white, and 300 on black. The test pressing is limited to 10 copies. I think there was kind of a mis-communication, because I’m pretty sure Todd wanted the clear copies to be more of a “friend’s press” type deal… But instead they went out with pre-orders to everyone. So they pressed 100 more records, this time on blue vinyl. Oddly enough, 4 copies (that they know of) came out as green vinyl, and I own 1 of those 4. Later they did another 900 copies on black vinyl. You can tell it is a 2nd press by the “B9R:64” on the labels. The entire first pressing doesn’t have the catalog number on the labels at all.

Test pressing, out of 10 copies. Todd mailed this to me just after the record release shows.

Close-up of test pressing labels, released in summer of 2005, just before final Carry On shows in July. Betrayed played one of the shows.

Stamped labels, out of 90, sold at the Record Release show. I believe the show was in San Diego at the Che Cafe? Todd saved me one and mailed it up to me with a test pressing shortly after the show.

Here’s the green vs. blue vinyl. 100 copies were pressed, 96 on blue, 4 came out green (that we know of). The green definitely has a lot of blue streaks in it.

A closer look at just the green, out of only 4 copies known to exist. You can see the blue streaks better in this photo.

Layout design was done by Anthony Pappalardo of In My Eyes fame.

There was also a 12″ release of this EP, released by Dead & Gone Records in the UK. 500 copies only, all on black vinyl. I also owned a test pressing of this release, but I sold it to Dobek in Japan last year.

Here is a photo of the 12″ test pressing that I sold to Dobek Ohashi last year. It is #8/10.

B9R-65 Miles Away – “S/T” CD

B9R-66 The Trouble – “Nobody Laughs Anymore” CD

B9R-67 No Turning Back – “Rise From The Ashes” CD

B9R-68 Miles Away – “Consequences” CD

B9R-69 Various Artists – “Singles Volume 2” CD

B9R-70 Think I Care – “World Asylum” LPI always really liked Think I Care on recording, but I was always disappointed with their live show. It just came off really boring to me, but maybe it was just due to weak crowd interaction? I don’t know. Anyway, I just always envisioned their sets being cooler than they ever ended up being. Their records are awesome though, the most angry/bitter shit – good stuff, haha! One pressing only: 150 record release copies on orange/grey “nuclear” pattern vinyl with spray painted cover, 300 on orange splatter, 500 on orange/grey swirl, and 50 copies on orange/grey swirl with the “1999-2006” cover for This Is Hardcore Fest 2006. I also owned a test pressing of this album, out of 20 copies, but I sold it a while back.

Here is the test pressing that I sold last year. Mine was #13/20.

This Is Hardcore Cover, out of 50 copies. It’s hard to see, but it is hand-numbered in gold pen on the lower right hand corner, mine is #48/50.

The cover and insert.

B9R-71 Death Before Dishonor / Black Friday ’29 – “Split” 7″Apparently Death Before Dishonor and/or Chris Wrenn met the guys in Black Friday ’29 while on tour in Europe, and the result was this split materializing shortly thereafter on B9. 500 on clear/black splatter, 1,000 on yellow/black splatter. There were also 76 copies with B9 “Warehouse edition” covers, but I didn’t buy one of those.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-72 Crime In Stereo – “The Troubled Stateside” LPI wasn’t really familiar with Crime In Stereo, but I bought the “Is Dead” LP when it came out on Bridge 9 and I really liked it a lot! It was pop punk stuff, which I’m not usually into, but Crime In Stereo set themselves apart with some serious rockin guitar riffs and unique songs. These guys are really talented! Once I had “Is Dead”, I went ahead and bought the other LP’s, including this one, which is a B9 re-release of the same album that was originally released on another label. The B9 pressing was 200 on purple vinyl, 500 on clear, and 1,300 on white vinyl (white vinyl shown below).

1,300 on white vinyl.

V/A – “Bridge Nine MMVI (2006)” 7″Basically a “sampler” 7″. 500 on purple, 1,000 on orange vinyl.

The layout of the fold-over cover.

B9R-74 Outbreak – “Failure” LPI seriously love the original Florian artwork for this release! It’s a guy in business attire being tormented by demons who are trying to convince him to commit suicide. It’s a powerful image, and I really dig the Japanese style of the demon characters. I also like the vibrant red hellish color used in the art. This LP actually wasn’t released on Bridge 9 – B9 only released the CD. The vinyl was released by Outbreak vocalist Ryan’s own label, Thinkfast Records. The 1st pressing was 300 on green splatter, 700 on black. The 2nd pressing was 1,000 on red splatter vinyl. I also owned a test pressing, but I sold it a while back, so it didn’t make this particular photo.

Here’s the photo that I used when I sold the Outbreak LP test pressing. It came with a regular LP jacket, and does not have any markings on the blank white labels.

The jacket and the insert. It’s too bad the insert wasn’t also in full color, with more sweet artwork!

Huge poster for their Japanese tour in 2006.

B9R-75 Have Heart – “The Things We Carry” LP

There is actually a full Have Heart blog entry that has write-ups and photos for all of their releases. This is just an excerpt from that entry… I can’t believe that a band wrote a record as good as “The Things We Carry” in the year 2006. I don’t know why I say that, I just hadn’t felt the energy of a classic in such a long time. I still listen to this album once or twice a month, especially when I’m on a run or something like that. It’s even more impressive that they took such a huge step from the “What Counts” EP to TTWC LP. The LP really blows their previous stuff away. Pat’s lyrics and vocals matured to a point on the first LP that was just perfect. I think I love his voice so much because I think that’s exactly what I always wanted my voice to sound like when I was doing The Damage Done. I love that it’s energetic, you feel like you’re at a show. And it’s angry as fuck, but with feeling, without just sounding like a gruff metal dude or something. You can feel the lyrics actually represented by the inflection of anger/pain in the vocals, as opposed to some dudes that just have kind of a “locked-in notch” in their throat where everything they scream has the same general sound. Not to mention, this is all duplicated when he’s singing live at a show. You can tell that there’s thought flowing through is mind as he’s singing those words, it’s not just practice and routine that tends to happen over time with performing night after night. Lyrically, he’s not afraid to be emotional regarding his love and respect for his father, or write lyrics tackling deeper emotional issues in our society like “We confuse our love with lust….. Remember what love is?” I can’t imagine most younger hardcore bands singing about things like this. Musically, I love that it’s got a heavy tone to it when compared to a classic “youth crew” type sound, but still super energetic. The top row is all 1st pressing (including test pressing), the bottom row is 2nd through current pressings. The only thing missing is the record release copy. I couldn’t fit it nicely into the picture, so it’s shown in a different photo below. I also owned a 4th pressing test pressing out of 20 copies (when they did the black and red vinyl pressings), but I sold it before taking this photo. There is an individual photo of that 4th pressing test further down.

The 1st pressing test pressing, out of 15 copies. Mine is #10/15.

The first pressing was just 1,000 copies: ~300 blue/yellow swirl, ~700 brown/orange swirl.

They did 100 record release copies that had a bunch of hearts spray painted into an X on the front of the cover, haha. Some record release copies had blue/yellow vinyl, some had the brown/orange vinyl.

These record release copies were sold at End Of Summer Jam on August 27th, 2006. The back cover was spray painted with EOSJ and the date.

I love the artwork of this LP. A lot of people talked shit about it when it came out, I guess because it wasn’t very “hardcore”. But I disagree wholeheartedly. I think it looks super cool, and the 1st pressing vinyl colors were picked well too. Up above you can see the inside of the gatefold layout, depicting the scene as the sun rises and sets.

They kept the gatefold layout for the 2nd and 3rd pressing of 1,000 each, but this time with some weirder mixed colors for the vinyl. 2nd press is shown on the bottom left – yellow with green splatter. The bottom right is 3rd pressing tri-color yellow/white/green.

With the 4th pressing, some good and some bad happened. Bad: they went away from the gatefold layout because it was too expensive to keep producing those, and they made it a regular jacket with insert (shown above). Boooo! Good: they switched pressing plants back to the U.S. and started doing straightforward vinyl colors like transparent red and transparent gold – no more crazy stuff. Because of the new pressing plant, they had to make new test pressings (out of 20 copies), which I mentioned before. You can see it in the photo below. With the 4th pressing they did 100 copies on black vinyl (the only version of this album on black, other than test pressings), and 1,000 on red vinyl. The 5th pressing was 1,000 on gold vinyl.

Here is a photo of the 4th pressing test pressing that I sold a while back, #6/20. I had the guy who bought the test email me a photo! They re-made test pressings when they switched to United Record Pressing and pressed the 4th pressing red and black vinyl.

This is a tour poster for the Have Heart, Go It Alone, Sinking Ships West Coast Tour in 2006. This same design was used on a t-shirt that I used to own, but I sold it because it was too small. This poster hangs on the wall in my living room because I like the design and the colors match the rest of the decor of my living room really well. haha, Yes, I’m a dork.

Below is the Bridge 9 Bonus 7″ series, up through #9.

B9R-B1 Terror – “Live And Death: Live At The Showcase Theatre” 7″While Bridge 9 was pressing the No Warning – “Ill Blood” LP, there had been a ton of problems (namely, the PB&J vinyl color fiasco), so people waited for months for their pre-orders while things got sorted out. When the pre-orders finally came, there was an “apology note” included, plus a special bonus 7″ for free – the Terror “Live and Death” at the Showcase Theatre 7″! This was the first of the beginning of the “Bridge Nine Bonus Series” of 7″s. There were 500 of these Terror 7″s pressed, but only those 173 copies that came with No Warning pre-orders got a special “Sorry about the No Warning” stamp. So the rest of the copies without the “sorry stamp” are out of 327. One of each version is shown above. It’s interesting that there were only 173 different people who pre-ordered the No Warning LP, despite it being a hugely anticipated record back then. This just goes to show how much hardcore has grown in the last 10 years and our expectation of a “big record” these days is much, much bigger than that. But make no mistake, this was a big, big record back then!

Stamp on b-side of Terror 7″: “Sorry the No Warning LP took so long. Here is a gift from the B9 Crew.”

Here’s the note apologizing for the delays and explaining the free Terror 7″!

B9R-B2 American Nightmare – “Live In London” 7″

The “Live In London” 7″ all came on white vinyl out of 750. It was one of the free Bonus 7″s that Bridge 9 gave away to those who did some summer pre-orders for other releases.

Here’s the little note that came with the Summer 2003 pre-orders, apologizing for delays due to the seven different 7″ releases that were going on at the same time! This AN 7″ was a free bonus 7″ to those that ordered all seven releases.

B9R-B3 Slapshot – “The New England Product Session” 7″This 7″ is limited to 500 copies. It was given away free to anyone who pre-ordered both the Slapshot and Some Kind Of Hate LP’s.

B9R-B4 Champion – “The Truth” 7″“The Truth” 7″ came with the Bridge 9 pre-orders in Summer 2004: Give Up The Ghost 2×7″, Ramallah 2×7″ and The Distance 7″. If you ordered all 3 records, you got a copy of “The Truth” 7″ for free, out of 500 copies. This 7″ features an un-used 1st mix version of “The Truth” from the Promises Kept LP, while the b-side features a cover of SSD’s “Glue”. I got my test pressing from Chris Williams. At one point I traded him some Rivalry test pressings for some Champion test pressings.

This is the letter that came with the pre-orders, explaining the free Champion 7″. It also discusses some serious drama with Lumberjack Distribution holding a bunch of Bridge 9’s money as “reserves” for possible returns, after B9 had left Lumberjack for Caroline distribution. Funny thing – Lumberjack filed bankruptcy a few years later. I think B9 finally did get the money, but it was years and years later.

B9R-B5 Wrecking Crew – “Why Must They / Live At CBGB’s” 7″500 copies pressed, given away free to anyone who pre-ordered the Wrecking Crew “1987-1991” CD.

B9R-B6 Miles Away – “Worlds Apart” 7″500 copies pressed, and given away free to those who pre-ordered the Champion “Time Slips Away” CD. This was a cool thing for B9 to do because Champion and Chris Wrenn had just met Miles Away on the Champion Australian tour, so B9 was releasing this 7″ as a promo to spread the word about a cool Australian band that had just helped them out. I think it’s cool that they returned the favor like that. Later, B9 released an official CD release for Miles Away.

B9R-B7 Champion – “Live In Oz” 7″The “Live In Oz” was a Bridge Nine bonus 7″ that you got for free when you pre-ordered the Champion “Time Slips Away” CD in 2005. The CD had both Champion EP’s combined on one 13 song CD. There were only 500 copies pressed of the 7″, and it featured a live recording from one of Champion’s recent shows in Australia. My test pressing is #12/16. I got it from Chris Williams in a trade for some Rivalry test pressings a few years ago.

B9R-B8 The Trouble – “Live At The Rat” 7″Only 500 copies made. Given away for free to anyone who pre-ordered The Trouble “Nobody Laughs Anymore” CD.

B9R-B9 Death Threat – “Live At The Showcase Theatre” 7″Only 500 copies pressed. Given away free to anyone who pre-ordered the Bridge Nine Singles Collection CD.

My Bridge 9 Records collection, at its peak… “MISSING:” means I never had it.

  • B9R-001 Tenfold / Sum Of All Fears (GREEN, #18/113, Bridge 9 Records #1)
  • B9R-001 Tenfold / Sum Of All Fears (BLACK, #266/900, Bridge 9 Records #1)
  • B9R-002 Tenfold – Now Is Our Time (BLUE, #147/200, 1st press, Bridge 9 Records #2)
  • B9R-002 Tenfold – Now Is Our Time (CLEAR, #79/100, 2nd press, Bridge 9 Records #2)
  • B9R-002 Tenfold – Now Is Our Time (BLACK, out of 500, 2nd press, Bridge 9 Records #2)
  • B9R-003 Proclamation – Straight Edge Hardcore (WHITE, 1st press, #84/101)
  • B9R-003 Proclamation – Straight Edge Hardcore (RED, 1st press, #30/200)
  • B9R-003 Proclamation – Straight Edge Hardcore (BLACK, 1st press, #36/700)
  • B9R-003 Proclamation – Straight Edge Hardcore (CLEAR, 2nd press, #33/380)
  • B9R-004 the Trust – s/t (GOLD, #’d 89/101)
  • B9R-004 the Trust – s/t (BLACK, #’d 568/1001)
  • B9R-005 Proclamation “Taken By Force” CD
  • B9R-006 Right Brigade/A Poor Excuse – (TEST PRESS, #9/25)
  • B9R-006 Right Brigade/A Poor Excuse – (BLACK, w/Iron Cross rip off cover, #’d 09/69)
  • B9R-006 Right Brigade/A Poor Excuse – (BLACK, w/CUSTOM PRINTING CAN FUCK OFF! cover, out of 100)
  • B9R-006 Right Brigade/A Poor Excuse – (BLACK, w/ltd. Boston Invasion cover #’d 54/150)
  • B9R-006 Right Brigade/A Poor Excuse – (BLACK, w/regular cover, out of 181)
  • B9R-006 Right Brigade/A Poor Excuse – (YELLOW MARBLE, #’d 37/153)
  • B9R-006 Right Brigade/A Poor Excuse – (RED, #’d 13/355)
  • B9R-006 Right Brigade/A Poor Excuse – (CLEAR, 2nd press, out of 250)
  • B9R-006 Right Brigade/A Poor Excuse – (GOLD, 2nd press, out of 750)
  • B9R-006 Right Brigade/A Poor Excuse – (WHITE, 3rd press, out of 350)
  • B9R-007 American Nightmare – s/t (TEST PRESS, #24/27)
  • B9R-007 American Nightmare – s/t (CLEAR, 1st press, #70/100)
  • B9R-007 American Nightmare – s/t (RED, 1st press, #63/152)
  • B9R-007 American Nightmare – s/t (WHITE, 1st press, out of 355)
  • B9R-007 American Nightmare – s/t (BLUE, 1st press, Summer Tour 2000 press, #231/300)
  • B9R-007 American Nightmare – s/t (BLUE, 1st press, out out of 500)
  • B9R-007 American Nightmare – s/t (GREY, 2nd press, BTSJ4 cover, #82/250)
  • B9R-007 American Nightmare – s/t (BLACK, 3rd press, out out of 900)
  • B9R-007 American Nightmare – s/t (BLACK, 4th press, Drummer cover, out of 600)
  • MISSING: Mosh camp YELLOW cover, RED vinyl, /6
  • MISSING: Mosh camp BLUE cover, RED vinyl, /24
  • B9R-008 Ten Yard Fight “The Only Way” VHS
  • B9R-009 American Nightmare – The Sun Isn’t Getting Any Brighter (LIGHT ORANGE/CREAM, 1st press, LIGHT ORANGE is more rare than the darker orange out of the 100 pressed on orange)
  • B9R-009 American Nightmare – The Sun Isn’t Getting Any Brighter (ORANGE MARBLE, 1st press, out of 100)
  • B9R-009 American Nightmare – The Sun Isn’t Getting Any Brighter (RED labels, 1st press, out of 150)
  • B9R-009 American Nightmare – The Sun Isn’t Getting Any Brighter (WHITE labels, 1st press, out of 350)
  • B9R-009 American Nightmare – The Sun Isn’t Getting Any Brighter (BLUE labels, 1st press, out of 500)
  • B9R-009 American Nightmare – The Sun Isn’t Getting Any Brighter (SILVER labels, 1st press, out of 900)
  • B9R-009 American Nightmare – The Sun Isn’t Getting Any Brighter (BLACK labels w/SILVER ink, 2nd press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-009 American Nightmare – The Sun Isn’t Getting Any Brighter (PURPLE, 3rd press, Euro Tour version, out of 600)
  • B9R-009 American Nightmare – The Sun Isn’t Getting Any Brighter (BLACK, 4th press, IV label detail, out of 1500)
  • B9R-010 Death Threat – Peace And Security (BLUE, w/spray painted clear sleeve, out of 40)
  • B9R-010 Death Threat – Peace And Security (GREY, out of 150)
  • B9R-010 Death Threat – Peace And Security (BLUE, out of 770)
  • B9R-011 Shark Attack – Blood In The Water (TEST PRESS, My War #2, Bridge 9 used the My War plates, so the MWR-02 test pressings are the only ones that exist for this release)
  • B9R-011 Shark Attack – Blood In The Water (GREY, out of 150, Bridge 9 recs)
  • B9R-011 Shark Attack – Blood In The Water (RED, Fuck Philly stamp, #25/60 and #13/60 has 2 tickets, Bridge 9 recs)
  • B9R-011 Shark Attack – Blood In The Water (RED, out of 350, Bridge 9 recs)
  • B9R-011 Shark Attack – Blood In The Water (BLACK, w/RED labels, out of 1500, Bridge 9 Recs)
  • B9R-011 Shark Attack – Blood In The Water (BLACK, w/WHITE labels, 2nd press, out of 1000, Bridge 9 Recs)
  • B9R-012 Breaker Breaker – (BLACK, San Diego Fest cover, #19/30)
  • B9R-012 Breaker Breaker – (CLEAR, w/RED labels, out of 50)
  • B9R-012 Breaker Breaker – (CLEAR, w/BLACK labels, out of 150)
  • B9R-012 Breaker Breaker – (RED, out of 350)
  • B9R-012 Breaker Breaker – (BLACK, out of 1500)
  • B9R-013 Cops And Robbers – Execution Style (BLUE, out of 150)
  • B9R-013 Cops And Robbers – Execution Style (WHITE, out of 350)
  • B9R-013 Cops And Robbers – Execution Style (BLACK, out of 1500)
  • B9R-014 the Hope Conspiracy – File: 03 (BLACK, 2-sided Jesuseater split songs on B-side, “JAN 30” on dust sleeve, out of 100)
  • B9R-014 the Hope Conspiracy – File: 03 (CLEAR, w/silk screen on B-side, out of 150)
  • B9R-014 the Hope Conspiracy – File: 03 (MAROON, etched B-side, out of 500)
  • B9R-014 the Hope Conspiracy – File: 03 (BLACK, etched B-side, out of 1500)
  • B9R-015 The Hope Conspiracy “File: 03” CDEP
  • B9R-016 No Warning “S/T” CD
  • B9R-017 Panic – Dying For It (TEST PRESS, out of 8, personalized Azy Relph)
  • B9R-017 Panic – Dying For It (GREEN MARBLE, out of 150)
  • B9R-017 Panic – Dying For It (BLUE/YELLOW SPLIT, out of 400)
  • B9R-017 Panic – Dying For It (BLACK, out of 1500)
  • B9R-018 Over My Dead Body / Death Threat – Split (TEST PRESS, #5/15)
  • B9R-018 Over My Dead Body / Death Threat – Split (GREEN, 1st press, w/WHITE OMDB record release cover, out of 100)
  • B9R-018 Over My Dead Body / Death Threat – Split (GREEN, 1st press, w/RED DT record release cover, out of 100)
  • B9R-018 Over My Dead Body / Death Threat – Split (YELLOW, 1st press, out of 300)
  • B9R-018 Over My Dead Body / Death Threat – Split (GREEN, 1st press, w/regular cover, out of 500)
  • B9R-018 Over My Dead Body / Death Threat – Split (GOLD, 2nd press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-018 Over My Dead Body / Death Threat – Split (BLUE, 3rd press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-018 Over My Dead Body / Death Threat – Split (RED, Final press, out of 250)
  • B9R-019 Carry On – A Life Less Plagued (TEST PRESS, out of 8 )
  • B9R-019 Carry On – A Life Less Plagued (ORANGE, very dark orange/almost red with white swirls, out of 150)
  • B9R-019 Carry On – A Life Less Plagued (ORANGE, lighter orange with white swirls, out of 150)
  • B9R-019 Carry On – A Life Less Plagued (CLEAR, with hand-drawn LINAS art from Fall 2001 Tour, 1 OF ONLY 7 THAT EXIST)
  • B9R-019 Carry On – A Life Less Plagued (CLEAR, out of 400)
  • B9R-019 Carry On – A Life Less Plagued (BLACK, out of 1400)
  • B9R-020 Breathe In – From This Day On (WHITE, out of 150)
  • B9R-020 Breathe In – From This Day On (RED, out of 350)
  • B9R-020 Breathe In – From This Day On (BLACK, out of 500)
  • B9R-021 Breathe In – Nervous Breakdown Tribute (BLACK, out of 500)
  • B9R-022 Sinners and Saints “The Sky Is Falling” CD
  • B9R-023 Reaching Forward “Burning The Lies” CD
  • B9R-024 Sworn In – s/t (YELLOW, out of 220)
  • B9R-024 Sworn In – s/t (CLEAR/BLACK SPLIT, out of 425)
  • B9R-024 Sworn In – s/t (RED/BLACK SPLIT, out of 600)
  • B9R-024 Sworn In – s/t (BLACK, out of 1200)
  • B9R-025 Kill Your Idols/Good Riddance – (PINK, 1st press, out of 300)
  • B9R-025 Kill Your Idols/Good Riddance – (WHITE, 1st press, out of 700)
  • B9R-025 Kill Your Idols/Good Riddance – (BLACK, 1st press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-025 Kill Your Idols/Good Riddance – (RED, 2nd press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-026 Champion – Count Our Numbers (TEST PRESS, #5/16)
  • B9R-026 Champion – Count Our Numbers (WHITE 1st press, 5/17/02 record release cover, #48/116)
  • B9R-026 Champion – Count Our Numbers (BLUE MARBLE, 1st press, out of 250)
  • B9R-026 Champion – Count Our Numbers (WHITE, 1st press, out of 384)
  • B9R-026 Champion – Count Our Numbers (BLACK, 1st press, out of 1250)
  • B9R-026 Champion – Count Our Numbers (CLEAR BLUE, 2nd press, out of 60)
  • B9R-026 Champion – Count Our Numbers (CLEAR PURPLE, 2nd press, out of 340)
  • B9R-027 Some Kind Of Hate – s/t (TEST PRESS #10/20, personalized to Todd Jones)
  • B9R-027 Some Kind Of Hate – s/t (BLACK, w/AN “The Sun…” b-side label, out of 50)
  • B9R-027 Some Kind Of Hate – s/t (BLACK, w/big hole in middle 45 style, #’d 228/300)
  • B9R-027 Some Kind Of Hate – s/t (ORANGE, out of 700)
  • B9R-027 Some Kind Of Hate – s/t (BLACK, out of 1000)
  • B9R-028 Panic – s/t (TEST PRESS, personalized Gibby Miller, #6/10)
  • B9R-028 Panic – s/t (WHITE, 1st press, out of 200)
  • B9R-028 Panic – s/t (BLACK, 1st press, out of 300)
  • B9R-028 Panic – s/t (CLEAR, 1st press, out of 1465)
  • B9R-028 Panic – s/t (PINK, Final Pressing, Posi Fest 2005, out of 200)
  • MISSING: Back To School Jam cover /35
  • B9R-029 Striking Distance – The Fuse Is Lit (BLUE, out of 200)
  • B9R-029 Striking Distance – The Fuse Is Lit (RED/ORANGE cow pattern, out of 600)
  • B9R-029 Striking Distance – The Fuse Is Lit (BLACK, out of 1200)
  • B9R-030 No Warning – Ill Blood (TEST PRESS)
  • B9R-030 No Warning – Ill Blood (PEANUT BUTTER & JELLY, out of 50)
  • B9R-030 No Warning – Ill Blood (BLOOD & SHIT, out of 350)
  • B9R-030 No Warning – Ill Blood (BLACK, out of 600)
  • B9R-030 No Warning – Ill Blood (BLOOD & SHIT, B9 Warehouse Edition, #29/141)
  • B9R-030 No Warning – Ill Blood (BLACK, B9 Warehouse Edition, #92/141)
  • B9R-031 Holding On – Question What You Live For (TEST PRESS, out of 8 )
  • B9R-031 Holding On – Question What You Live For (YELLOW, plant mis-press out of 42)
  • B9R-031 Holding On – Question What You Live For (GREY, stamped H/O on blank white labels, out of 90)
  • B9R-031 Holding On – Question What You Live For (BLACK, out of 96)
  • B9R-031 Holding On – Question What You Live For (ORANGE, out of 275)
  • B9R-031 Holding On – Question What You Live For (GREY, out of 500)
  • B9R-031 Holding On – Question What You Live For (GREY, Final Press, sold at last MLIW show, #44/40)
  • B9R-032 Slapshot “Greatest Hits, Slashes & Crosschecks” CD
  • B9R-033 Ramallah – But A Whimper (GOLD, out of 500)
  • B9R-033 Ramallah – But A Whimper (ORANGE, out of 1000)
  • B9R-034 Terror – Lowest Of The Low (TEST PRESS, out of 4)
  • B9R-034 Terror – Lowest Of The Low (YELLOW MARBLE, 1st press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-034 Terror – Lowest Of The Low (CLEAR, 2nd press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-035 American Nightmare – Year One 2×7″ (1 ORANGE, 1 CLEAR vinyl, out of 500)
  • B9R-035 American Nightmare – Year One 2×7″ (1 BLUE, 1 BLACK vinyl, out of 1000)
  • B9R-036 Champion – Come Out Swinging (REJECTED TEST PRESS #/3, “modern day archie” etching, B9)
  • B9R-036 Champion – Come Out Swinging (ACCEPTED TEST PRESS, out of 8, “modern day archie” with hand written “BUNKER” etching, B9)
  • B9R-036 Champion – Come Out Swinging (CLEAR GREEN w/blank white labels RARE, we think only 3 exist, B9)
  • B9R-036 Champion – Come Out Swinging (GREEN MARBLE, Posi Numbers 2003 cover #69/116, B9)
  • B9R-036 Champion – Come Out Swinging (MINT GREEN, part of the green marble pressing but just a little lighter shade)
  • B9R-036 Champion – Come Out Swinging (GREEN MARBLE, out of 300, B9)
  • B9R-036 Champion – Come Out Swinging (CLEAR, out of 700, B9)
  • B9R-036 Champion – Come Out Swinging (ORANGE MARBLE, Final pressing, Posi Fest 2005, B9)
  • B9R-037 On The Rise “Burning Inside” CD
  • B9R-038 American Nightmare (Give Up The Ghost) – Love American (TEST PRESS, out of 10, AN angel stamped on dust sleeeve)
  • B9R-038 American Nightmare (Give Up The Ghost) – Love American (PICTURE DISC, out of 1000)
  • B9R-039 Stand And Fight – Impact Demo (BLUE, out of 300)
  • B9R-039 Stand And Fight – Impact Demo (RED, out of 700)
  • B9R-040 Mental – Get An Oxygen Tank! (GREEN, 1st press, Mental Crew cover, rec release 08.23.03, out of 100)
  • B9R-040 Mental – Get An Oxygen Tank! (BLACK, 1st press, Posi Numbers 2003 press, #117/250)
  • B9R-040 Mental – Get An Oxygen Tank! (CLEAR PURPLE, 1st press, out of 300)
  • B9R-040 Mental – Get An Oxygen Tank! (YELLOW MARBLE, 1st press, out of 700)
  • B9R-040 Mental – Get An Oxygen Tank! (SOLID PURPLE, 2nd press, out of 500)
  • B9R-041 F-Minus – Sweating Blood (BLACK with PINK labels, out of 115)
  • B9R-041 F-Minus – Sweating Blood (RED, out of 300)
  • B9R-041 F-Minus – Sweating Blood (CLEAR w/RED splotch in middle, out of 550)
  • B9R-042 Stand And Fight – s/t (BLACK, Posi Fest 2003 stamp, out of 250)
  • B9R-042 Stand And Fight – s/t (GREEN, out of 300)
  • B9R-042 Stand And Fight – s/t (WHITE, out of 700)
  • B9R-042 Sick Of It All – Relentless (CLEAR RED/WHITE SPLIT, plant mis-press, out of 14)
  • B9R-042 Sick Of It All – Relentless (BLACK, with PURPLE labels, out of 115)
  • B9R-043 Sick Of It All – Relentless (WHITE, out of 300)
  • B9R-043 Sick Of It All – Relentless (MAROON/WHITE SPLIT, out of 550)
  • B9R-044 Slapshot – Digital Warfare (BLACK, out of 300)
  • B9R-044 Slapshot – Digital Warfare (YELLOW, out of 700)
  • B9R-045 Some Kind Of Hate – Undisputed (TEST PRESS, water damaged cover, personalized to Todd Jones, out of 10)
  • B9R-045 Some Kind Of Hate – Undisputed (REJECTED TEST PRESS, out of 10)
  • B9R-045 Some Kind Of Hate – Undisputed (BLACK, pre-press, out of 200)
  • B9R-045 Some Kind Of Hate – Undisputed (PURPLE, out of 300)
  • B9R-045 Some Kind Of Hate – Undisputed (WHITE, out of 700)
  • B9R-046 Anger Regiment – Aces And Eights (GREEN, out of 100)
  • B9R-046 Anger Regiment – Aces and Eights (BLACK, out of 300)
  • B9R-046 Anger Regiment – Aces and Eights (RED, out of 700)
  • B9R-047 the Distance – Your Closest Enemies (RED, out of 150)
  • B9R-047 the Distance – Your Closest Enemies (CLEAR, out of 350)
  • B9R-047 the Distance – Your Closest Enemies (WHITE, out of 550)
  • B9R-048 Outbreak – You Make Us Sick (TEST PRESS, out of 15)
  • B9R-048 Outbreak – You Make Us Sick (YELLOW/GREEN, out of 340)
  • B9R-048 Outbreak – You Make Us Sick (YELLOW/BLACK, out of 770)
  • B9R-048 Outbreak – You Make Us Sick (BLOOD RED, out of 1100)
  • B9R-048 Outbreak – You Make Us Sick (YELLOW/BLACK, B9 Warehouse Edition cover, #12/143)
  • B9R-049 Project X – 7″ (TEST PRESS, Bridge 9 Records, out of 21. Thank you note written on dust sleeve from Chris Wrenn to Daniel Halfter for his contributions to the Skiz book)
  • B9R-049 Project X – 7″ (WHITE #104/500, Bridge 9 Records, out of 500. w/Schism book and PX T-shirt sz M)
  • B9R-049 Project X – 7″ (BLACK, 1st press, Bridge 9 Records, out of 1500)
  • B9R-049 Project X – 7″ (BLACK, 2nd press, Bridge 9 Records, out of 1000)
  • B9R-049 Project X – 7″ (CLEAR, 3rd press, Bridge 9 Records, out of 1000)
  • B9R-050 ?????
  • B9R-051 Various Artists “Singles Volume 1” CD
  • B9R-052 Stand And Fight – Together We Win (TEST PRESS, out of 15)
  • B9R-052 Stand And Fight – Together We Win (PURPLE, out of 330)
  • B9R-052 Stand And Fight – Together We Win (BLUE/GREY SWIRL, out of 770)
  • B9R-053 For The Worse – The Chaos Continues (BLUE, out of 300)
  • B9R-053 For The Worse – The Chaos Continues (YELLOW, out of 700)
  • MISSING: BLACK vinyl w/alternate cover /100
  • B9R-054 For The Worse “Blood, Guts, Going Nuts” CD
  • B9R-055 Champion “Time Slips Away” CD
  • B9R-056 Champion – Promises Kept (REJECTED TEST PRESS, original/rejected mix, blank stamped labels, Bridge 9, matrix: A=”B9R:56-A” B=”B9R:56-B”)
  • B9R-056 Champion – Promises Kept (WHITE, original/rejected mix, 09/04/2004 rec release cover, no Bridge 9 logo on back, out of 150)
  • B9R-056 Champion – Promises Kept (WHITE, original/rejected mix, 09/04/2004 rec release cover, with Bridge 9 logo on back, out of 150)
  • B9R-056 Champion – Promises Kept (TEST PRESS, Erika labels, Bridge 9, matrix: A=”B9R:56R-A” B=”B9R:56R-B”)
  • B9R-056 Champion – Promises Kept (BLUE, 1st press, stamped labels, Bridge 9, out of 220)
  • B9R-056 Champion – Promises Kept (MAROON, 1st press, Bridge 9, out of 300)
  • B9R-056 Champion – Promises Kept (GREY, 1st press, Bridge 9, out of 700)
  • B9R-056 Champion – Promises Kept (BLACK, 2nd press, Bridge 9, out of 500)
  • B9R-056 Champion – Promises Kept (YELLOW/BLACK MARBLE, 3rd press last show pressing, Bridge 9, out of 400)
  • B9R-056 Champion – Promises Kept (YELLOW/BLACK MARBLE, B9 Warehouse Edition, #177/205)
  • B9R-056 Champion – Promises Kept (WHITE, B9 Warehouse Edition, #10/12)
  • B9R-057 the Distance/Some Kind of Hate/Outbreak – 3 way 7″ (GOLD, 1st press, West Coast Tour press, out of 300)
  • B9R-057 the Distance/Some Kind of Hate/Outbreak – 3 way 7″ (YELLOW, 1st press, out of 300)
  • B9R-057 the Distance/Some Kind of Hate/Outbreak – 3 way 7″ (CLEAR, 1st press, out of 700)
  • B9R-057 the Distance/Some Kind of Hate/Outbreak – 3 way 7″ (MINT GREEN, 2nd press, out of 400)
  • B9R-058 Wrecking Crew “1987-1991” CD
  • B9R-059 Terror – One With The Underdogs (TEST PRESS, Erika labels)
  • B9R-059 Terror – One With The Underdogs (GOLD, out of 150)
  • B9R-059 Terror – One With The Underdogs (WHITE, out of 150)
  • B9R-059 Terror – One With The Underdogs (GREEN, out of 700)
  • B9R-060 Various Artists “Hardcore Comp” CD
  • B9R-060 No Warning – Suffer Surfive (TEST PRESS, out of 16, B9R-060 in matrix. Yes, B9 pressed test pressings for this album but never released it. There are only 16 copies of this album pressed on vinyl in the world.)
  • B9R-061 Death Before Dishonor – Friends, Family, Forever (GOLD/BLACK SPLIT, out of 300)
  • B9R-061 Death Before Dishonor – Friends, Family, Forever (GOLD w/BLACK SPLATTER, out of 700)
  • B9R-062 RNR / Fit For Abuse – Split (TEST PRESS on RED VINYL)
  • B9R-062 RNR / Fit For Abuse – Split (CLEAR, out of 300)
  • B9R-062 RNR / Fit For Abuse – Split (WHITE, out of 700)
  • B9R-062 RNR / Fit For Abuse – Split (RED, 2nd press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-063 Blue Monday – Rewritten (TEST PRESS, out of 20)
  • B9R-063 Blue Monday – Rewritten (AQUA, Record Release cover 09/10/05, #27/50)
  • B9R-063 Blue Monday – Rewritten (AQUA, out of 250)
  • B9R-063 Blue Monday – Rewritten (PURPLE, w/Sink With Cali Fest 2005 cover, #5/50)
  • B9R-063 Blue Monday – Rewritten (PURPLE, out of 650)
  • B9R-063 Blue Monday – Rewritten (PICTURE DISC, Rivalry Showcase 2006 cover, #24/50)
  • B9R-063 Blue Monday – Rewritten (PICTURE DISC, out of 450)
  • B9R-064 Betrayed – Addiction EP (TEST PRESS, out of 10)
  • B9R-064 Betrayed – Addiction EP (GREEN, out of 4)
  • B9R-064 Betrayed – Addiction EP (BLUE, out of 96)
  • B9R-064 Betrayed – Addiction EP (BLACK w/RED stamped labels, rec release, out of 90)
  • B9R-064 Betrayed – Addiction EP (CLEAR, out of 100)
  • B9R-064 Betrayed – Addiction EP (RED, out of 250)
  • B9R-064 Betrayed – Addiction EP (WHITE, out of 250)
  • B9R-064 Betrayed – Addiction EP (BLACK, out of 300)
  • B9R-064 Betrayed – Addiction EP (BLACK, 2nd press with B9R:64 detail label, out of 900)
  • B9R-065 Miles Away “S/T” CD
  • B9R-066 The Trouble “Nobody Laughs Anymore” CD
  • B9R-067 No Turning Back “Rise From The Ashes” CD
  • B9R-068 Miles Away “Consequences” CD
  • B9R-069 Various Artists “Singles Volume 2” CD
  • B9R-070 Think I Care – World Asylum (TEST PRESS, #13/20)
  • B9R-070 Think I Care – World Asylum (ORANGE/GREY SWIRL, This Is Hardcore 2006 cover 1999-2006, #48/50)
  • B9R-070 Think I Care – World Asylum (ORANGE/GREY SPLIT, Record Release cover, out of 150)
  • B9R-070 Think I Care – World Asylum (ORANGE w/BLACK SPLATTER, out of 300)
  • B9R-070 Think I Care – World Asylum (ORANGE/GREY SWIRL, out of 550)
  • B9R-071 Death Before Dishonor / Black Friday ’29 – (CLEAR w/BLACK SPLATTER, out of 500)
  • B9R-071 Death Before Dishonor / Black Friday ’29 – (YELLOW w/BLACK SPLATTER, out of 1000)
  • MISSING: Warehouse edition #/72
  • B9R-072 Crime In Stereo – The Troubled Stateside (PURPLE, out of 200)
  • B9R-072 Crime In Stereo – The Troubled Stateside (CLEAR, out of 500)
  • B9R-072 Crime In Stereo – The Troubled Stateside (WHITE, out of 1300)
  • B9R-073 V/A – Bridge Nine 2006 (ORANGE, Have Heart, Triple Threat, Outbreak, Think I Care, out of 500)
  • B9R-073 V/A – Bridge Nine 2006 (PURPLE, Have Heart, Triple Threat, Outbreak, Think I Care, out of 1000)
  • B9R-074 Outbreak – Failure (TEST PRESS, out of 10)
  • B9R-074 Outbreak – Failure (GREEN w/CLEAR SPLATTER, 1st press, out of 300)
  • B9R-074 Outbreak – Failure (BLACK, 1st press, out of 700)
  • B9R-074 Outbreak – Failure (RED w/YELLOW SPLATTER, 2nd press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-075 Have Heart – The Things We Carry (TEST PRESS, #10/15)
  • B9R-075 Have Heart – The Things We Carry (BLUE/YELLOW swirl, Record Release cover 08.27.2006 EOSJ, out of 40)
  • B9R-075 Have Heart – The Things We Carry (BLUE/YELLOW swirl, 1st press, out of 260)
  • B9R-075 Have Heart – The Things We Carry (BROWN/YELLOW swirl, 1st press, out of 640)
  • B9R-075 Have Heart – The Things We Carry (YELLOW/GREEN splatter, 2nd press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-075 Have Heart – The Things We Carry (YELLOW/GREEN/WHITE SPLIT, 3rd press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-075 Have Heart – The Things We Carry (TEST PRESS, 4th press, #6/20)
  • B9R-075 Have Heart – The Things We Carry (BLACK, 4th press, gatefold jacket, out of 100)
  • B9R-075 Have Heart – The Things We Carry (RED, 4th press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-075 Have Heart – The Things We Carry (GOLD, 5th press, out of 1000)
  • ————————-END COMPLETE COLLECTION————————–
  • B9R-076 Triple Threat – Into The Darkness (CLEAR, out of 300)
  • B9R-077 Panic – Strength In Solitude (GREEN/YELLOW/BLACK SWIRL, out of 200)
  • B9R-077 Panic – Strength In Solitude (GREEN w/BLACK SPLATTER, out of 300)
  • B9R-077 Panic – Strength In Solitude (GREEN/BLACK SWIRL, out of 500)
  • B9R-078 Champion – Different Directions – The Last Show (TEST PRESS, #16/20)
  • B9R-078 Champion – Different Directions – The Last Show (YELLOW, out of 100)
  • B9R-078 Champion – Different Directions – The Last Show (CLEAR w/SPLATTER, out of 900)
  • B9R-081 Death Before Dishonor – Break Through It All (RED w/BLACK SPLATTER, out of 500)
  • B9R-082 Death Before Dishonor – Count Me In (BROWN/BLACK/WHITE, out of 500)
  • B9R-083 Ruiner – The Lives We Fear (ORANGE w/BLACK SPLATTER, out of 500)
  • B9R-084 Ruiner – Prepare To Be Let Down (ORANGE/PURPLE SPLIT, out of 300)
  • B9R-085 Ambitions – Exile (BLUE/ORANGE split, out of 300)
  • B9R-086 Ambitions – Stranger (ORANGE w/BLACK splatter, out of 400)
  • B9R-087 Ceremony – Scared People (TEST PRESS, #20/20)
  • B9R-087 Ceremony – Scared People (PINK/GREEN Easter Egg, 1st press, out of 100)
  • B9R-087 Ceremony – Scared People (BLACK, rec release cover, 1st press, #99/99)
  • B9R-087 Ceremony – Scared People (BLACK, regular cover, 1st press, out of 301)
  • B9R-087 Ceremony – Scared People (BLACK/WHITE SWIRL, 1st press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-087 Ceremony – Scared People (WHITE, 1st press, out of 1500)
  • B9R-087 Ceremony – Scared People (BLACK/WHITE SPLIT, 2nd press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-089 Agnostic Front – For My Family (GOLD/SILVER split, mis-press with “Dead To Me” on b-side)
  • B9R-089 Agnostic Front – For My Family (GOLD/SILVER split, out of 500)
  • B9R-090 Crime In Stereo – Is Dead (BLUE, out of 400)
  • B9R-092 H2O – Nothing To Prove (GREEN, out of 500)
  • B9R-093 Verse – Story Of A Free Man (TEST PRESS #14/15)
  • B9R-093 Verse – Story Of A Free Man (CLEAR, out of 300)
  • B9R-093 Verse – Story Of A Free Man (RED, out of 700)
  • B9R-094 Have Heart – You Can’t Go Home Again (TEST PRESS, #7/25)
  • B9R-094 Have Heart – You Can’t Go Home Again (BLACK, out of 500)
  • B9R-094 Have Heart – You Can’t Go Home Again (YELLOW, out of 1000)
  • B9R-095 Verse – Aggression (TEST PRESS, #1/25)
  • B9R-095 Verse – Aggression (BLACK, Record Release cover 06.20.2008, out of 100)
  • B9R-095 Verse – Aggression (BLACK/CLEAR SPLIT, out of 220)
  • B9R-095 Verse – Aggression (RED w/BLACK HAZE, Summer Tour 2008, out of 220)
  • B9R-095 Verse – Aggression (WHITE/GREY SWIRL, out of 525)
  • B9R-095 Verse – Aggression (RED, out of 1030)
  • B9R-095 Verse – Aggression (GREY, 2nd press, out of 1030)
  • B9R-096 Have Heart – Songs To Scream At The Sun (TEST PRESS, #6/18)
  • B9R-096 Have Heart – Songs To Scream At The Sun (CLEAR, 1st press, out of 112)
  • B9R-096 Have Heart – Songs To Scream At The Sun (YELLOW, 1st press, out of 531)
  • B9R-096 Have Heart – Songs To Scream At The Sun (WHITE, 1st press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-096 Have Heart – Songs To Scream At The Sun (SOLID BLUE, 1st press, out of 1395)
  • B9R-096 Have Heart – Songs To Scream At The Sun (GREEN, 2nd press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-096 Have Heart – Songs To Scream At The Sun (CLEAR BLUE, 3rd press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-096 Have Heart – Songs To Scream At The Sun (ORANGE, 4th press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-097 Ceremony – He-god-Has Favored our Undertakings (GREY, out of 750)
  • B9R-097 Ceremony – He-god-Has Favored our Undertakings (BLACK, out of 750)
  • B9R-098 Ceremony – Still Nothing Moves You (GREEN MARBLE, Friends Press, out of ?)
  • B9R-098 Ceremony – Still Nothing Moves You (GREY, 1st Press, out of 900)
  • B9R-098 Ceremony – Still Nothing Moves You (OLIVE GREEN, 2nd Press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-100 ???????
  • B9R-102 Cruel Hand – Life In Shambles (BROWN, out of 300)
  • B9R-102 Cruel Hand – Life In Shambles (MAROON, out of 700)
  • B9R-103 Cruel Hand – Prying Eyes (PURPLE, out of 500)
  • B9R-104 Crime In Stereo – Selective Wreckage (GREEN, out of 200)
  • B9R-110 Polar Bear Club – Sometimes Things Just Disappear (OLIVE GREEN, out of 600)
  • B9R-113 Paint It Black – Amnesia (MUDDY RAINBOW, 1st press, out of 300)
  • B9R-113 Paint It Black – Amnesia (GREY, 1st press, out of 700)
  • B9R-113 Paint It Black – Amnesia (WHITE, 1st press, out of 1500)
  • B9R-113 Paint It Black – Amnesia (CLEAR, 2nd press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-115 Soul Control – Silent Reality (BROWN, out of 700)
  • B9R-120 Strike Anywhere – Failed State (CLEAR, out of 300)
  • B9R-120 Strike Anywhere – Failed State (CLEAR w/GREEN SPLATTER, out of 700)
  • B9R-120 Strike Anywhere – Failed State (GREEN, out of 1000)
  • B9R-121 Soul Control – Cycles (WHITE, out of 200)
  • B9R-123 Polar Bear Club – Chasing Hamburg (PINK, out of 400)
  • B9R-126 Strike Anywhere – Iron Front (CLEAR, 1st press, out of 300)
  • B9R-126 Strike Anywhere – Iron Front (PINK, 1st press, out of 700)
  • B9R-126 Strike Anywhere – Iron Front (SOLID GREEN, 1st press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-126 Strike Anywhere – Iron Front (CLEAR GREEN, 2nd press, out of 1000)
  • B9R-127 Polar Bear Club – The Redder, The Better (RED, out of 800)
  • B9R-128 Agnostic Front – United Blood (GOLD, B9 repress, out of 400)
  • B9R-129 Agnostic Front – Victim In Pain (GOLD, B9 repress, out of 400)
  • B9R-131 Crime In Stereo – I Was Trying To Describe You To Someone (RED, out of 600)
  • B9R-140 Have Heart – 10.17.09 (TEST PRESS, #6/20)
  • B9R-140 Have Heart – 10.17.09 (GREEN, out of 100)
  • B9R-140 Have Heart – 10.17.09 (RED, out of 600)
  • B9R-140 Have Heart – 10.17.09 (WHITE, out of 1000)
  • B9R-140 Have Heart – 10.17.09 (BLUE, out of 1000)
  • B9RBONUS-01 Terror – Live And Death (BLACK, B9 Bonus 7″ #1, w/o the No Warning message on b-side, out of 173)
  • B9RBONUS-01 Terror – Live And Death (BLACK, B9 Bonus 7″ #1, w/”No Warning thank you message” on b-side, out of 327)
  • B9RBONUS-02 American Nightmare (Give Up The Ghost) – Live In London (WHITE, B9 Bonus 7″ #2, out of 750)
  • B9RBONUS-03 Slapshot – The New England Product Session (B9 Bonus 7″ #3, out of 500)
  • B9RBONUS-04 Champion – The Truth (TEST PRESS, out of 8 )
  • B9RBONUS-04 Champion – The Truth b/w Glue (BLACK, B9 Bonus 7″ #4, out of 500)
  • B9RBONUS-05 Wrecking Crew – Why Must They / Live At CBGB’s (BLACK, B9 Bonus 7″ #5, out of 500)
  • B9RBONUS-06 Miles Away – B9 Bonus 7″ (BLACK, B9 Bonus 7″ #6, out of 500)
  • B9RBONUS-07 Champion – Live in Australia (TEST PRESS, #12/16)
  • B9RBONUS-07 Champion – Live in Australia (BLACK, B9 Bonus 7″ #7, out of 500)
  • B9RBONUS-08 the Trouble – Live At The Rat (BLACK, B9 Bonus 7″ #8, out of 500)
  • B9RBONUS-09 Death Threat – Live At The Showcase Theatre (BLACK, B9 Bonus 7″ #9, out of 500)
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5 Responses to Bridge 9 Records

  1. Pingback: Bridge 9 Records #1-75 Documentary |

  2. jensen says:

    Well, thanks for all the work you put into this post! As a vinyl nerd I really enjoyed reading it and fighting the boredom at work. Looking forward to following all the links in the text.

  3. Anonymous says:

    By the way: I put a link to this blog on the message board of Visions, a german magazine for alternative music. It’s in a thread about vinyl, hope you don’t mind. Here’s the link: http://www.visions.de/community/forum/topic/104/plattencover-ein-bilderthread/144

  4. Chris Estrada says:

    What are the chances you may be interested in selling those posters, mainly the Shark Attack one or know someone who may be down?

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